Project Details

Layman's description

In the discussion about food production, many hopes are pinned on small-scale food production with an explicit orientation towards sustainability (“regenerative agriculture”). Small-scale regenerative agriculture is endorsed because it preserves the soil, enhances local food security and self-sufficiency, less transport is needed, and communities can control what they eat and how it is produced. However, the current pace and extent of global environmental change – especially climate change- will continue to pose threats to food production in any form, both through short-term acute disruptions such as extreme weather events, and through long-term shifts in precipitation patterns and crop productivity. Resilience- the capacity to cope with climate change but also to transform production practices when needed -is a highly sought after commodity. Our project is based on the premise that social learning about climate change is the key factor that determines whether small-scale food production will prove to be resilient under climate pressures (compare De los Rios et al., 2016; Shaw & Kristjanson, 2014). Social learning is an observational form of learning that occurs in the context of social interaction, which means that individual climate resilient behavior and practices can be emulated and diffuse, thus unlocking community action. In this project, we will identify the conditions that affect social learning in the face of climate change, building on various social learning typologies in the environmental change domain.

Extended description

In the discussion about food production, many hopes are pinned on small-scale food production with an explicit orientation towards sustainability (“regenerative agriculture”). Small-scale regenerative agriculture is endorsed because it preserves the soil, enhances local food security and self-sufficiency, less transport is needed, and communities can control what they eat and how it is produced. However, the current pace and extent of global environmental change – especially climate change- will continue to pose threats to food production in any form, both through short-term acute disruptions such as extreme weather events, and through long-term shifts in precipitation patterns and crop productivity. Resilience- the capacity to cope with climate change but also to transform production practices when needed -is a highly sought after commodity. Our project is based on the premise that social learning about climate change is the key factor that determines whether small-scale food production will prove to be resilient under climate pressures (compare De los Rios et al., 2016; Shaw & Kristjanson, 2014). Social learning is an observational form of learning that occurs in the context of social interaction, which means that individual climate resilient behavior and practices can be emulated and diffuse, thus unlocking community action. In this project, we will identify the conditions that affect social learning in the face of climate change, building on various social learning typologies in the environmental change domain.
Short titleSocial learning and the climate crisis
StatusNot started
Effective start/end date1/12/211/12/25

Keywords

  • Social learning
  • Climate change
  • Food production
  • Supply chains

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