Autism and nutrition: the role of the gut-brain axis

Marijke M.H. van De Sande, Vincent J. van Buul, FJPH Brouns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by deficits in the ability to socialise, communicate and use imagination, and displays of stereotypical behaviour. It is widely accepted that ASD involves a disorder in brain development. However, the real causes of the neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD are not clear. In this respect, it has been found that a majority of children with ASD display gastrointestinal symptoms, and an increased intestinal permeability. Moreover, large differences in microbiotic composition between ASD patients and controls have been reported. Therefore, nutrition-related factors have been hypothesised to play a causal role in the aetiology of ASD and its symptoms. Through a review of the literature, it was found that abnormalities in carbohydrate digestion and absorption could explain some of the gastrointestinal problems observed in a subset of ASD patients, although their role in the neurological and behavioural problems remains uncertain. In addition, the relationship between an improved gut health and a reduction of symptoms in some patients was evaluated. Recent trials involving gluten-free diets, casein-free diets, and pre- and probiotic, and multivitamin supplementation show contradictive but promising results. It can be concluded that nutrition and other environmental influences might trigger an unstable base of genetic predisposition, which may lead to the development of autism, at least in a subset of ASD patients. Clear directions for further research to improve diagnosis and treatment for the different subsets of the disorder are provided.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-214
Number of pages16
JournalNutrition Research Reviews
Volume27
Issue number2
Early online date8 Jul 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Brain
Gluten-Free Diet
Imagination
Prebiotics
Aptitude
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Probiotics
Brain Diseases
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Caseins
Digestion
Permeability
Carbohydrates
Diet
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Treatment
  • Diagnosis
  • Gluten-free diets
  • Gut-brain axis

Cite this

van De Sande, M. M. H., van Buul, V. J., & Brouns, FJPH. (2014). Autism and nutrition: the role of the gut-brain axis. Nutrition Research Reviews, 27(2), 199-214. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954422414000110
van De Sande, Marijke M.H. ; van Buul, Vincent J. ; Brouns, FJPH. / Autism and nutrition: the role of the gut-brain axis. In: Nutrition Research Reviews. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 199-214.
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van De Sande, MMH, van Buul, VJ & Brouns, FJPH 2014, 'Autism and nutrition: the role of the gut-brain axis', Nutrition Research Reviews, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 199-214. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954422414000110

Autism and nutrition: the role of the gut-brain axis. / van De Sande, Marijke M.H.; van Buul, Vincent J.; Brouns, FJPH.

In: Nutrition Research Reviews, Vol. 27, No. 2, 12.2014, p. 199-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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