Bonding personal social capital as an ingredient for positive aging and mental well-being: A study among a sample of Dutch elderly

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Abstract

Objectives: The current study aims to add to the limited empirical research of possible benefits of personal social capital for the well-being of elderly. A validated personal social capital scale, measuring both bonding and bridging social capital in a general population, was adjusted to fit the characteristics of the social environment of elderly, to explore the association between social capital and well-being of elderly, as well as the mediating role of loneliness.

Method: A sample of 328 Dutch adults, varying in age from 65 to 90 years (Mean = 72.07; SD = 4.90) filled out an online questionnaire including the adapted personal social capital scale for elderly (PSCSE), as well as validated scales measuring social, emotional, and psychological well-being and loneliness. Relevant other (demographic) variables were included for testing construct and criterion validity.

Results: CFA analysis revealed the subdimensions bonding and bridging social capital with reliability scores of respectively α = .88 and α = .87, and α = .89 for the total scale. Regression analyses confirmed construct and criterion validity. Subsequently, significant positive associations between bonding social capital and respectively social, emotional and psychological well-being were found. These associations were mediated by loneliness. Bridging social capital was only found to be significantly associated with social well-being, not mediated by loneliness.

Conclusion: Our findings have enhanced our understanding of the association between social capital and mental well-being of elderly and indicate that bonding personal social capital in particular may be considered an ingredient for positive aging.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalAging & Mental Health
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Aug 2019

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Loneliness
Social Capital
Object Attachment
Psychology
Empirical Research
Social Environment
Regression Analysis
Demography
Population

Keywords

  • personal social capital
  • bonding social capital
  • mental well-being
  • positive aging
  • elderly

Cite this

@article{effd7c2a436b4c988bc4b5f803ca9c21,
title = "Bonding personal social capital as an ingredient for positive aging and mental well-being: A study among a sample of Dutch elderly",
abstract = "Objectives: The current study aims to add to the limited empirical research of possible benefits of personal social capital for the well-being of elderly. A validated personal social capital scale, measuring both bonding and bridging social capital in a general population, was adjusted to fit the characteristics of the social environment of elderly, to explore the association between social capital and well-being of elderly, as well as the mediating role of loneliness.Method: A sample of 328 Dutch adults, varying in age from 65 to 90 years (Mean = 72.07; SD = 4.90) filled out an online questionnaire including the adapted personal social capital scale for elderly (PSCSE), as well as validated scales measuring social, emotional, and psychological well-being and loneliness. Relevant other (demographic) variables were included for testing construct and criterion validity.Results: CFA analysis revealed the subdimensions bonding and bridging social capital with reliability scores of respectively α = .88 and α = .87, and α = .89 for the total scale. Regression analyses confirmed construct and criterion validity. Subsequently, significant positive associations between bonding social capital and respectively social, emotional and psychological well-being were found. These associations were mediated by loneliness. Bridging social capital was only found to be significantly associated with social well-being, not mediated by loneliness.Conclusion: Our findings have enhanced our understanding of the association between social capital and mental well-being of elderly and indicate that bonding personal social capital in particular may be considered an ingredient for positive aging.",
keywords = "personal social capital, bonding social capital, mental well-being, positive aging, elderly",
author = "Marianne Simons and Johan Lataster and Jennifer Reijnders and Sanne Peeters and Mayke Janssens and Nele Jacobs",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1080/13607863.2019.1650887",
language = "English",
journal = "Aging & Mental Health",
issn = "1360-7863",
publisher = "ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD",

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T1 - Bonding personal social capital as an ingredient for positive aging and mental well-being

T2 - A study among a sample of Dutch elderly

AU - Simons, Marianne

AU - Lataster, Johan

AU - Reijnders, Jennifer

AU - Peeters, Sanne

AU - Janssens, Mayke

AU - Jacobs, Nele

PY - 2019/8/7

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N2 - Objectives: The current study aims to add to the limited empirical research of possible benefits of personal social capital for the well-being of elderly. A validated personal social capital scale, measuring both bonding and bridging social capital in a general population, was adjusted to fit the characteristics of the social environment of elderly, to explore the association between social capital and well-being of elderly, as well as the mediating role of loneliness.Method: A sample of 328 Dutch adults, varying in age from 65 to 90 years (Mean = 72.07; SD = 4.90) filled out an online questionnaire including the adapted personal social capital scale for elderly (PSCSE), as well as validated scales measuring social, emotional, and psychological well-being and loneliness. Relevant other (demographic) variables were included for testing construct and criterion validity.Results: CFA analysis revealed the subdimensions bonding and bridging social capital with reliability scores of respectively α = .88 and α = .87, and α = .89 for the total scale. Regression analyses confirmed construct and criterion validity. Subsequently, significant positive associations between bonding social capital and respectively social, emotional and psychological well-being were found. These associations were mediated by loneliness. Bridging social capital was only found to be significantly associated with social well-being, not mediated by loneliness.Conclusion: Our findings have enhanced our understanding of the association between social capital and mental well-being of elderly and indicate that bonding personal social capital in particular may be considered an ingredient for positive aging.

AB - Objectives: The current study aims to add to the limited empirical research of possible benefits of personal social capital for the well-being of elderly. A validated personal social capital scale, measuring both bonding and bridging social capital in a general population, was adjusted to fit the characteristics of the social environment of elderly, to explore the association between social capital and well-being of elderly, as well as the mediating role of loneliness.Method: A sample of 328 Dutch adults, varying in age from 65 to 90 years (Mean = 72.07; SD = 4.90) filled out an online questionnaire including the adapted personal social capital scale for elderly (PSCSE), as well as validated scales measuring social, emotional, and psychological well-being and loneliness. Relevant other (demographic) variables were included for testing construct and criterion validity.Results: CFA analysis revealed the subdimensions bonding and bridging social capital with reliability scores of respectively α = .88 and α = .87, and α = .89 for the total scale. Regression analyses confirmed construct and criterion validity. Subsequently, significant positive associations between bonding social capital and respectively social, emotional and psychological well-being were found. These associations were mediated by loneliness. Bridging social capital was only found to be significantly associated with social well-being, not mediated by loneliness.Conclusion: Our findings have enhanced our understanding of the association between social capital and mental well-being of elderly and indicate that bonding personal social capital in particular may be considered an ingredient for positive aging.

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KW - positive aging

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