Decision rules, escalation of commitment and sensitivity to framing in group decision-making An experimental investigation

Petru Lucian Curseu*, Sandra G. L. Schruijer, Oana C. Fodor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to framing effect (FE) and escalation of commitment (EOC).

Design/methodology/approach - In an experimental study (using a sample of 233 professionals with project management experience), the authors test the effects of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to EOC and FE. The authors use four group decision-making tasks to evaluate decision consistency across gain/loss framed decision situations and six decision tasks to evaluate EOC for money as well as time as resources previously invested in the initial decisions.

Findings - The results show that the collaborative decision rule increases sensitivity to EOC when financial resources are involved and decreases sensitivity to EOC when time is of essence. Moreover, the authors show that the collaborative decision rule decreases sensitivity to FE in group decision making.

Research limitations/implications - The results have important implications for group rationality as an emergent group level competence by extending the insights concerning the impact of decision rules on emergent group level cognitive competencies. Due to the experimental nature of the design, the authors can probe the causal relations between the investigated variables, yet the authors cannot generalize the results to other settings.

Practical implications - Managers can use the insights of this study in order to optimize the functioning of decision-making groups and to reduce their sensitivity to FEs and EOC.

Originality/value - The study extends the research on group rationality and it is one of the few experimental attempts used to understand the role of decision rules on emergent group level rationality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1649-1668
Number of pages20
JournalManagement Decision
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Group decision making
  • Escalation of commitment
  • Framing effect
  • Heuristics and biases
  • INTRAGROUP CONFLICT
  • GROUP POLARIZATION
  • NEGATIVE AFFECT
  • SUNK COSTS
  • TIME
  • PERFORMANCE
  • TEAMS
  • MONEY
  • COMPREHENSIVENESS
  • METAANALYSIS

Cite this

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title = "Decision rules, escalation of commitment and sensitivity to framing in group decision-making An experimental investigation",
abstract = "Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to framing effect (FE) and escalation of commitment (EOC).Design/methodology/approach - In an experimental study (using a sample of 233 professionals with project management experience), the authors test the effects of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to EOC and FE. The authors use four group decision-making tasks to evaluate decision consistency across gain/loss framed decision situations and six decision tasks to evaluate EOC for money as well as time as resources previously invested in the initial decisions.Findings - The results show that the collaborative decision rule increases sensitivity to EOC when financial resources are involved and decreases sensitivity to EOC when time is of essence. Moreover, the authors show that the collaborative decision rule decreases sensitivity to FE in group decision making.Research limitations/implications - The results have important implications for group rationality as an emergent group level competence by extending the insights concerning the impact of decision rules on emergent group level cognitive competencies. Due to the experimental nature of the design, the authors can probe the causal relations between the investigated variables, yet the authors cannot generalize the results to other settings.Practical implications - Managers can use the insights of this study in order to optimize the functioning of decision-making groups and to reduce their sensitivity to FEs and EOC.Originality/value - The study extends the research on group rationality and it is one of the few experimental attempts used to understand the role of decision rules on emergent group level rationality.",
keywords = "Group decision making, Escalation of commitment, Framing effect, Heuristics and biases, INTRAGROUP CONFLICT, GROUP POLARIZATION, NEGATIVE AFFECT, SUNK COSTS, TIME, PERFORMANCE, TEAMS, MONEY, COMPREHENSIVENESS, METAANALYSIS",
author = "Curseu, {Petru Lucian} and Schruijer, {Sandra G. L.} and Fodor, {Oana C.}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1108/MD-06-2015-0253",
language = "English",
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journal = "Management Decision",
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}

Decision rules, escalation of commitment and sensitivity to framing in group decision-making An experimental investigation. / Curseu, Petru Lucian; Schruijer, Sandra G. L.; Fodor, Oana C.

In: Management Decision, Vol. 54, No. 7, 2016, p. 1649-1668.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decision rules, escalation of commitment and sensitivity to framing in group decision-making An experimental investigation

AU - Curseu, Petru Lucian

AU - Schruijer, Sandra G. L.

AU - Fodor, Oana C.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to framing effect (FE) and escalation of commitment (EOC).Design/methodology/approach - In an experimental study (using a sample of 233 professionals with project management experience), the authors test the effects of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to EOC and FE. The authors use four group decision-making tasks to evaluate decision consistency across gain/loss framed decision situations and six decision tasks to evaluate EOC for money as well as time as resources previously invested in the initial decisions.Findings - The results show that the collaborative decision rule increases sensitivity to EOC when financial resources are involved and decreases sensitivity to EOC when time is of essence. Moreover, the authors show that the collaborative decision rule decreases sensitivity to FE in group decision making.Research limitations/implications - The results have important implications for group rationality as an emergent group level competence by extending the insights concerning the impact of decision rules on emergent group level cognitive competencies. Due to the experimental nature of the design, the authors can probe the causal relations between the investigated variables, yet the authors cannot generalize the results to other settings.Practical implications - Managers can use the insights of this study in order to optimize the functioning of decision-making groups and to reduce their sensitivity to FEs and EOC.Originality/value - The study extends the research on group rationality and it is one of the few experimental attempts used to understand the role of decision rules on emergent group level rationality.

AB - Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to framing effect (FE) and escalation of commitment (EOC).Design/methodology/approach - In an experimental study (using a sample of 233 professionals with project management experience), the authors test the effects of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups' sensitivity to EOC and FE. The authors use four group decision-making tasks to evaluate decision consistency across gain/loss framed decision situations and six decision tasks to evaluate EOC for money as well as time as resources previously invested in the initial decisions.Findings - The results show that the collaborative decision rule increases sensitivity to EOC when financial resources are involved and decreases sensitivity to EOC when time is of essence. Moreover, the authors show that the collaborative decision rule decreases sensitivity to FE in group decision making.Research limitations/implications - The results have important implications for group rationality as an emergent group level competence by extending the insights concerning the impact of decision rules on emergent group level cognitive competencies. Due to the experimental nature of the design, the authors can probe the causal relations between the investigated variables, yet the authors cannot generalize the results to other settings.Practical implications - Managers can use the insights of this study in order to optimize the functioning of decision-making groups and to reduce their sensitivity to FEs and EOC.Originality/value - The study extends the research on group rationality and it is one of the few experimental attempts used to understand the role of decision rules on emergent group level rationality.

KW - Group decision making

KW - Escalation of commitment

KW - Framing effect

KW - Heuristics and biases

KW - INTRAGROUP CONFLICT

KW - GROUP POLARIZATION

KW - NEGATIVE AFFECT

KW - SUNK COSTS

KW - TIME

KW - PERFORMANCE

KW - TEAMS

KW - MONEY

KW - COMPREHENSIVENESS

KW - METAANALYSIS

U2 - 10.1108/MD-06-2015-0253

DO - 10.1108/MD-06-2015-0253

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 1649

EP - 1668

JO - Management Decision

JF - Management Decision

SN - 0025-1747

IS - 7

ER -