Effectiveness of video- versus text-based computer-tailored smoking cessation interventions among smokers after one year

NE Stanczyk, H. Vries de, MJJM Candel, JWM Muris, C. Bolman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background:
In western countries, smoking prevalence rates are high among smokers unmotivated to quit and those with a lower socioeconomic status (LSES). Multiple computer tailoring and the use of audio-visual aids may improve such interventions and increase cessation in LSES smokers. This study assessed the 12-month effectiveness of a video- and text-based computer-tailored intervention.

Methods:
A randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands was used in which smokers were allocated to the video-based condition (VC) (N = 670), the text-based condition (TC) (N = 708) or the control condition (CC) (brief generic text advice) (N = 721). After 12 months, self-reported prolonged abstinence was assessed and biochemically verified in respondents indicating to have quit smoking. Three analysis strategies were used to assess the effects: (1) multiple imputation (MI); (2) intention-to-treat (ITT); (3) complete case analysis (CC).

Results:
VC was more effective in prolonged abstinence compared to CC (odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, p = .005) and the text-based condition (OR = 1.71, p = .01). VC was furthermore more effective than TC. No differences were found for SES and motivational levels. Results were similar when using ITT and CC. For our secondary outcome seven-day point prevalence abstinence; however, neither VC (OR = 1.17, p = .34) or TC (OR = 0.91, p = .52) outperformed the CC.

Conclusion:
The video-based computer-tailored intervention was effective in obtaining substantial long-term abstinence compared to the text-based version and a brief generic text advice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-50
Number of pages9
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume82
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

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Smoking Cessation
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Smoking
Audiovisual Aids
Netherlands
Randomized Controlled Trials

Cite this

@article{e3a5010efb6c468b9b43548a12d38e57,
title = "Effectiveness of video- versus text-based computer-tailored smoking cessation interventions among smokers after one year",
abstract = "Background:In western countries, smoking prevalence rates are high among smokers unmotivated to quit and those with a lower socioeconomic status (LSES). Multiple computer tailoring and the use of audio-visual aids may improve such interventions and increase cessation in LSES smokers. This study assessed the 12-month effectiveness of a video- and text-based computer-tailored intervention.Methods:A randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands was used in which smokers were allocated to the video-based condition (VC) (N = 670), the text-based condition (TC) (N = 708) or the control condition (CC) (brief generic text advice) (N = 721). After 12 months, self-reported prolonged abstinence was assessed and biochemically verified in respondents indicating to have quit smoking. Three analysis strategies were used to assess the effects: (1) multiple imputation (MI); (2) intention-to-treat (ITT); (3) complete case analysis (CC).Results:VC was more effective in prolonged abstinence compared to CC (odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, p = .005) and the text-based condition (OR = 1.71, p = .01). VC was furthermore more effective than TC. No differences were found for SES and motivational levels. Results were similar when using ITT and CC. For our secondary outcome seven-day point prevalence abstinence; however, neither VC (OR = 1.17, p = .34) or TC (OR = 0.91, p = .52) outperformed the CC.Conclusion:The video-based computer-tailored intervention was effective in obtaining substantial long-term abstinence compared to the text-based version and a brief generic text advice.",
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Effectiveness of video- versus text-based computer-tailored smoking cessation interventions among smokers after one year. / Stanczyk, NE; Vries de, H.; Candel, MJJM; Muris, JWM; Bolman, C.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 82, 01.2016, p. 42-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effectiveness of video- versus text-based computer-tailored smoking cessation interventions among smokers after one year

AU - Stanczyk, NE

AU - Vries de, H.

AU - Candel, MJJM

AU - Muris, JWM

AU - Bolman, C.

N1 - exported from refbase (http://publicaties.ou.nl/show.php?record=1750), last updated on Thu, 02 Feb 2017 15:29:37 +0100

PY - 2016/1

Y1 - 2016/1

N2 - Background:In western countries, smoking prevalence rates are high among smokers unmotivated to quit and those with a lower socioeconomic status (LSES). Multiple computer tailoring and the use of audio-visual aids may improve such interventions and increase cessation in LSES smokers. This study assessed the 12-month effectiveness of a video- and text-based computer-tailored intervention.Methods:A randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands was used in which smokers were allocated to the video-based condition (VC) (N = 670), the text-based condition (TC) (N = 708) or the control condition (CC) (brief generic text advice) (N = 721). After 12 months, self-reported prolonged abstinence was assessed and biochemically verified in respondents indicating to have quit smoking. Three analysis strategies were used to assess the effects: (1) multiple imputation (MI); (2) intention-to-treat (ITT); (3) complete case analysis (CC).Results:VC was more effective in prolonged abstinence compared to CC (odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, p = .005) and the text-based condition (OR = 1.71, p = .01). VC was furthermore more effective than TC. No differences were found for SES and motivational levels. Results were similar when using ITT and CC. For our secondary outcome seven-day point prevalence abstinence; however, neither VC (OR = 1.17, p = .34) or TC (OR = 0.91, p = .52) outperformed the CC.Conclusion:The video-based computer-tailored intervention was effective in obtaining substantial long-term abstinence compared to the text-based version and a brief generic text advice.

AB - Background:In western countries, smoking prevalence rates are high among smokers unmotivated to quit and those with a lower socioeconomic status (LSES). Multiple computer tailoring and the use of audio-visual aids may improve such interventions and increase cessation in LSES smokers. This study assessed the 12-month effectiveness of a video- and text-based computer-tailored intervention.Methods:A randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands was used in which smokers were allocated to the video-based condition (VC) (N = 670), the text-based condition (TC) (N = 708) or the control condition (CC) (brief generic text advice) (N = 721). After 12 months, self-reported prolonged abstinence was assessed and biochemically verified in respondents indicating to have quit smoking. Three analysis strategies were used to assess the effects: (1) multiple imputation (MI); (2) intention-to-treat (ITT); (3) complete case analysis (CC).Results:VC was more effective in prolonged abstinence compared to CC (odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, p = .005) and the text-based condition (OR = 1.71, p = .01). VC was furthermore more effective than TC. No differences were found for SES and motivational levels. Results were similar when using ITT and CC. For our secondary outcome seven-day point prevalence abstinence; however, neither VC (OR = 1.17, p = .34) or TC (OR = 0.91, p = .52) outperformed the CC.Conclusion:The video-based computer-tailored intervention was effective in obtaining substantial long-term abstinence compared to the text-based version and a brief generic text advice.

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DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.11.002

M3 - Article

VL - 82

SP - 42

EP - 50

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -