Effects of Worked Examples, Example-Problem Pairs, and Problem-Example Pairs Compared to Problem Solving

Tamara Van Gog, Liesbeth Kester, Fred Paas

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademic

    33 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Research has demonstrated that instruction that relies more heavily on example study is more effective for learning than instruction consisting of problem solving. However, ‘a heavier reliance on example study’ has been implemented in different ways, using worked examples only, example-problem pairs, or problem-example pairs. Despite a large amount of research on example-based learning, these three strategies have not been compared to each other and to problem solving in a single study. Moreover, effects on cognitive load of these different strategies have not yet been systematically compared. Therefore, this study investigated the effects on cognitive load and learning of example study only, example-problem pairs, problem-example pairs, and problem solving only. Results show that it is not strictly necessary to alternate example study and problem solving: example study only and example-problem pairs were more effective and efficient than problem solving only and problem-example pairs.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 28 Oct 2010

    Keywords

    • Veni lke
    • Worked examples
    • Cogntive load theory
    • Problem solving

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