Expertise development for a visual task: Eye movements, verbal reports, and spatial abilities in air traffic control

Ludo Van Meeuwen, Halszka Jarodzka, Saskia Brand-Gruwel, Paul A. Kirschner, Jeano De Bock, Jeroen Van Merriënboer

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterAcademic

    Abstract

    Errors in Air Traffic Control (ATC) are a risk to human life hence, air traffic controllers have to make fast and correct decisions. These decisions are based on complex visualizations of a surrounding area (figure 1). These visualisations are complex because they involve representations of many moving airplanes including their labels with crucial information (i.e., call sign, speeds, heading, etc.). Despite of increasing air traffic, live of people must not be at risk, so further understanding the causes for successful air traffic controllers as well as understanding the difficulties of less experienced air traffic controllers is crucial. Such findings may inform user interface designers and instructional designers in ATC. Hence, this study examined how experts, intermediates, and novices in ATC perceive and interpret ATC stimuli on a perceptual level (by means of eye-tracking) and on a performance level. Furthermore, the potentially mediating influence of spatial abilities was investigated. ATC decisions and a potential mediating influence of spatial abilities was investigated.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 23 Aug 2011
    EventEuropean Conference on Eye Movements 2011 - Marseille, France
    Duration: 21 Aug 201125 Aug 2011
    Conference number: 16
    https://www.eyemovement.org/ecem.html

    Conference

    ConferenceEuropean Conference on Eye Movements 2011
    Abbreviated titleECEM 2011
    Country/TerritoryFrance
    CityMarseille
    Period21/08/1125/08/11
    Internet address

    Keywords

    • Visual task
    • expertise development

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