Explaining self-efficacy development in an authentic higher education learning context of role-play simulations

Dorothy Duchatelet*, Pieter Spooren, Peter Bursens, David Gijbels, Vincent Donche

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Role-play simulations have become commonly used active learning methods to teach about complex, dynamic political processes. However, an understanding of why there is variation in student learning during such simulations is lacking. This study focuses on the development of student self-efficacy in negotiating over the period of one simulation. We investigate to what extent self-efficacy development can be explained by the individual characteristics of students. This study further contributes to the field by including perceived student cohesiveness as a social aspect of the simulation. Data from 84 participants were collected during a four-day Model United Nations (MUN) simulation. Self-efficacy in negotiating was measured using 12 measurement times, and the data analysed using multilevel growth modelling. Results show a statistically significant linear increase in self-efficacy in negotiating over the period of the simulation. Compared to the time factor, individual characteristics explain variation in self-efficacy development to a larger extent, of which perceived student cohesiveness contributes the most.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100940
Number of pages9
JournalStudies in Educational Evaluation
Volume68
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Self-efficacy
  • Student cohesiveness
  • Role-play simulations
  • Political science education
  • ACADEMIC-PERFORMANCE
  • ACHIEVEMENT
  • NEGOTIATION
  • MULTILEVEL
  • OUTCOMES
  • BELIEFS

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