Exploring supply chain flexibility in a FMCG food supply chain

Jorieke H. M. Manders*, Marjolein C. J. Caniels, Paul W. Th. Ghijsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Empirical studies about supply chain flexibility have mainly focused on one (manufacturing) company, occasionally incorporating the adjoining view from a supplier, distributor, or retailer. The present paper argues that a dyadic perspective is not sufficient and that an integrated perspective is required. In-depth case study data was collected and analyzed. The data covers eight organizations in a fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) food supply chain, including suppliers, the main manufacturer, the logistics service provider, and retailers. Drawing on network theory and stakeholder theory, the study analyzed how these eight organizations experience flexibility across the supply chain. The findings show that each chain member implements flexibility to fulfill the direct needs of the next-tier chain member. Organizations at different positions in the supply chain prioritize other flexibilities. There is no support for overall supply chain flexibility. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-195
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Purchasing and Supply Management
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016
Event24th Annual Conference of the International-Purchasing-and-Supply-Education-and-Research-Association (IPSERA) - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 29 Mar 20151 Apr 2015

Keywords

  • Supply chain flexibility
  • Flexibility dimensions
  • Goals
  • Network theory
  • Stakeholder theory
  • FMCG food supply chain
  • ECONOMIC-EVALUATION MODEL
  • MANUFACTURING FLEXIBILITY
  • AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY
  • VOLUME FLEXIBILITY
  • CONCEPTUAL-MODEL
  • LEAD-TIME
  • PERFORMANCE
  • MANAGEMENT
  • LOGISTICS
  • INTEGRATION

Cite this

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title = "Exploring supply chain flexibility in a FMCG food supply chain",
abstract = "Empirical studies about supply chain flexibility have mainly focused on one (manufacturing) company, occasionally incorporating the adjoining view from a supplier, distributor, or retailer. The present paper argues that a dyadic perspective is not sufficient and that an integrated perspective is required. In-depth case study data was collected and analyzed. The data covers eight organizations in a fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) food supply chain, including suppliers, the main manufacturer, the logistics service provider, and retailers. Drawing on network theory and stakeholder theory, the study analyzed how these eight organizations experience flexibility across the supply chain. The findings show that each chain member implements flexibility to fulfill the direct needs of the next-tier chain member. Organizations at different positions in the supply chain prioritize other flexibilities. There is no support for overall supply chain flexibility. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
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author = "Manders, {Jorieke H. M.} and Caniels, {Marjolein C. J.} and Ghijsen, {Paul W. Th.}",
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Exploring supply chain flexibility in a FMCG food supply chain. / Manders, Jorieke H. M.; Caniels, Marjolein C. J.; Ghijsen, Paul W. Th.

In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, Vol. 22, No. 3, 09.2016, p. 181-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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