Eye movements during code debugging: expertise differences and didactic gaze

S.N. Emhardt, Ellen Kok, H.M. Jarodzka, Christian Drumm, S. Brand - Gruwel, Tamara Van Gog

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

A recent development in programming education is the popularity of tutorial videos that show a screencast of a (expert) teacher who explains how to perform a programming task. However, these videos are often visually cluttered and following the expert’s reasoning is presumably difficult for novice learners. One approach to foster attention guidance of novices in such videos is Eye Movement Modeling Examples (EMMEs: Van Gog, Jarodzka, Scheiter, Gerjets, & Paas, 2009). EMMEs superimpose visualizations of a didactically behaving person’s eye movements onto instructional videos. However, little is known about the characteristics of experts’ naturally occurring gaze patterns in comparison to their didactic gaze patterns while creating EMMEs. To investigate these gaze characteristics, a group of experts (N = 20) first debugged short computer code snippets while their eye movements were recorded. Subsequently, the experts were instructed to explain their solution didactically in an EMME video. A group of novices (N = 18) debugged the codes without the subsequent instruction to behave didactically. Our first research question is how experts’ natural gaze patterns differ from those of novices while debugging. Based on previous expertise research we investigate differences in gaze patterns between experts and novices. Our second research question is how experts’ gaze patterns change when being instructed to behave didactically. This explorative investigation provides insights into the characteristics of didactic gaze. Later, this knowledge could be used to create more effective EMMEs in programming education.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventEye Learn Symposium Utrecht - Utrecht University, Boothzaal, Universiteits Bibliotheek, De Uithof, Utrecht, Netherlands
Duration: 9 Jul 20189 Jul 2018

Symposium

SymposiumEye Learn Symposium Utrecht
CountryNetherlands
CityUtrecht
Period9/07/189/07/18

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didactics
expertise
expert
video
programming
visualization
popularity
education
Group
instruction
human being
teacher

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Emhardt, S. N., Kok, E., Jarodzka, H. M., Drumm, C., Brand - Gruwel, S., & Van Gog, T. (2018). Eye movements during code debugging: expertise differences and didactic gaze. Abstract from Eye Learn Symposium Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
Emhardt, S.N. ; Kok, Ellen ; Jarodzka, H.M. ; Drumm, Christian ; Brand - Gruwel, S. ; Van Gog, Tamara. / Eye movements during code debugging : expertise differences and didactic gaze. Abstract from Eye Learn Symposium Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
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title = "Eye movements during code debugging: expertise differences and didactic gaze",
abstract = "A recent development in programming education is the popularity of tutorial videos that show a screencast of a (expert) teacher who explains how to perform a programming task. However, these videos are often visually cluttered and following the expert’s reasoning is presumably difficult for novice learners. One approach to foster attention guidance of novices in such videos is Eye Movement Modeling Examples (EMMEs: Van Gog, Jarodzka, Scheiter, Gerjets, & Paas, 2009). EMMEs superimpose visualizations of a didactically behaving person’s eye movements onto instructional videos. However, little is known about the characteristics of experts’ naturally occurring gaze patterns in comparison to their didactic gaze patterns while creating EMMEs. To investigate these gaze characteristics, a group of experts (N = 20) first debugged short computer code snippets while their eye movements were recorded. Subsequently, the experts were instructed to explain their solution didactically in an EMME video. A group of novices (N = 18) debugged the codes without the subsequent instruction to behave didactically. Our first research question is how experts’ natural gaze patterns differ from those of novices while debugging. Based on previous expertise research we investigate differences in gaze patterns between experts and novices. Our second research question is how experts’ gaze patterns change when being instructed to behave didactically. This explorative investigation provides insights into the characteristics of didactic gaze. Later, this knowledge could be used to create more effective EMMEs in programming education.",
author = "S.N. Emhardt and Ellen Kok and H.M. Jarodzka and Christian Drumm and {Brand - Gruwel}, S. and {Van Gog}, Tamara",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
note = "Eye Learn Symposium Utrecht ; Conference date: 09-07-2018 Through 09-07-2018",

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Emhardt, SN, Kok, E, Jarodzka, HM, Drumm, C, Brand - Gruwel, S & Van Gog, T 2018, 'Eye movements during code debugging: expertise differences and didactic gaze' Eye Learn Symposium Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands, 9/07/18 - 9/07/18, .

Eye movements during code debugging : expertise differences and didactic gaze. / Emhardt, S.N.; Kok, Ellen; Jarodzka, H.M.; Drumm, Christian; Brand - Gruwel, S.; Van Gog, Tamara.

2018. Abstract from Eye Learn Symposium Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Eye movements during code debugging

T2 - expertise differences and didactic gaze

AU - Emhardt, S.N.

AU - Kok, Ellen

AU - Jarodzka, H.M.

AU - Drumm, Christian

AU - Brand - Gruwel, S.

AU - Van Gog, Tamara

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - A recent development in programming education is the popularity of tutorial videos that show a screencast of a (expert) teacher who explains how to perform a programming task. However, these videos are often visually cluttered and following the expert’s reasoning is presumably difficult for novice learners. One approach to foster attention guidance of novices in such videos is Eye Movement Modeling Examples (EMMEs: Van Gog, Jarodzka, Scheiter, Gerjets, & Paas, 2009). EMMEs superimpose visualizations of a didactically behaving person’s eye movements onto instructional videos. However, little is known about the characteristics of experts’ naturally occurring gaze patterns in comparison to their didactic gaze patterns while creating EMMEs. To investigate these gaze characteristics, a group of experts (N = 20) first debugged short computer code snippets while their eye movements were recorded. Subsequently, the experts were instructed to explain their solution didactically in an EMME video. A group of novices (N = 18) debugged the codes without the subsequent instruction to behave didactically. Our first research question is how experts’ natural gaze patterns differ from those of novices while debugging. Based on previous expertise research we investigate differences in gaze patterns between experts and novices. Our second research question is how experts’ gaze patterns change when being instructed to behave didactically. This explorative investigation provides insights into the characteristics of didactic gaze. Later, this knowledge could be used to create more effective EMMEs in programming education.

AB - A recent development in programming education is the popularity of tutorial videos that show a screencast of a (expert) teacher who explains how to perform a programming task. However, these videos are often visually cluttered and following the expert’s reasoning is presumably difficult for novice learners. One approach to foster attention guidance of novices in such videos is Eye Movement Modeling Examples (EMMEs: Van Gog, Jarodzka, Scheiter, Gerjets, & Paas, 2009). EMMEs superimpose visualizations of a didactically behaving person’s eye movements onto instructional videos. However, little is known about the characteristics of experts’ naturally occurring gaze patterns in comparison to their didactic gaze patterns while creating EMMEs. To investigate these gaze characteristics, a group of experts (N = 20) first debugged short computer code snippets while their eye movements were recorded. Subsequently, the experts were instructed to explain their solution didactically in an EMME video. A group of novices (N = 18) debugged the codes without the subsequent instruction to behave didactically. Our first research question is how experts’ natural gaze patterns differ from those of novices while debugging. Based on previous expertise research we investigate differences in gaze patterns between experts and novices. Our second research question is how experts’ gaze patterns change when being instructed to behave didactically. This explorative investigation provides insights into the characteristics of didactic gaze. Later, this knowledge could be used to create more effective EMMEs in programming education.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Emhardt SN, Kok E, Jarodzka HM, Drumm C, Brand - Gruwel S, Van Gog T. Eye movements during code debugging: expertise differences and didactic gaze. 2018. Abstract from Eye Learn Symposium Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.