Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences: a prospective longitudinal study

A. Tyborowska, I. Volman, H. Niemann, L. Pouwels, S. Smeekens, A. Cillessen, I. Tony, K. Roelofs

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

The early developing brain has been shown to be sensitive to stress, but less is known about the impact of early-life stress on neural maturation during adolescence. Based on animal and human literature we hypothesized that stress may interfere with known patterns of neural development during adolescence, namely subcortical growth and prefrontal pruning. In a prospective longitudinal study, 37 adolescents were followed since 15 months of age. We tested the relative impact of adverse events experienced early in life (until age 5) and recently (between age 14 and 17), involving personal events and social environment on brainchanges occurring between age 14 and 17. Personal events were indexed with the Life Events Scale. Social environment was indexed with peer social preference. We focus on changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the amygdala-hippocampal complex and in prefrontal cortex. Preliminary results show that GMV changes in those regions were differentially affected by early and recent experiences. Early adverse life-events were associated with a relative reduction of the amygdala-hippocampal region and insula. Recent exposure to an adverse social environment was associated with changes in the posterior hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.These findings suggest that brain maturation between age 14 and 17 is particularly sensitive to adverse personal events early in life, and to adverse social events during adolescence. These findings open the way to understand how personal and social adverse events lead to alterations in social and emotional behavior inadults.
Original languageEnglish
Pages40-41
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventThe 4th Annual Flux Congress - Ballpark Hilton, St. Louis, United States
Duration: 8 Sep 201610 Sep 2016
https://fluxsociety.org/2016-st-louis/

Conference

ConferenceThe 4th Annual Flux Congress
CountryUnited States
CitySt. Louis
Period8/09/1610/09/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
Social Environment
Prospective Studies
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Brain
Psychological Stress
Hippocampus
Gray Matter
Growth

Cite this

Tyborowska, A., Volman, I., Niemann, H., Pouwels, L., Smeekens, S., Cillessen, A., ... Roelofs, K. (2016). Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences: a prospective longitudinal study. 40-41. Abstract from The 4th Annual Flux Congress, St. Louis, United States.
Tyborowska, A. ; Volman, I. ; Niemann, H. ; Pouwels, L. ; Smeekens, S. ; Cillessen, A. ; Tony, I. ; Roelofs, K. / Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences : a prospective longitudinal study. Abstract from The 4th Annual Flux Congress, St. Louis, United States.2 p.
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Tyborowska, A, Volman, I, Niemann, H, Pouwels, L, Smeekens, S, Cillessen, A, Tony, I & Roelofs, K 2016, 'Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences: a prospective longitudinal study', The 4th Annual Flux Congress, St. Louis, United States, 8/09/16 - 10/09/16 pp. 40-41.

Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences : a prospective longitudinal study. / Tyborowska, A.; Volman, I.; Niemann, H.; Pouwels, L.; Smeekens, S.; Cillessen, A.; Tony, I.; Roelofs, K.

2016. 40-41 Abstract from The 4th Annual Flux Congress, St. Louis, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences

T2 - a prospective longitudinal study

AU - Tyborowska, A.

AU - Volman, I.

AU - Niemann, H.

AU - Pouwels, L.

AU - Smeekens, S.

AU - Cillessen, A.

AU - Tony, I.

AU - Roelofs, K.

N1 - exported from refbase (http://publicaties.ou.nl/show.php?record=1740), last updated on Mon, 26 Sep 2016 14:29:44 +0200

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The early developing brain has been shown to be sensitive to stress, but less is known about the impact of early-life stress on neural maturation during adolescence. Based on animal and human literature we hypothesized that stress may interfere with known patterns of neural development during adolescence, namely subcortical growth and prefrontal pruning. In a prospective longitudinal study, 37 adolescents were followed since 15 months of age. We tested the relative impact of adverse events experienced early in life (until age 5) and recently (between age 14 and 17), involving personal events and social environment on brainchanges occurring between age 14 and 17. Personal events were indexed with the Life Events Scale. Social environment was indexed with peer social preference. We focus on changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the amygdala-hippocampal complex and in prefrontal cortex. Preliminary results show that GMV changes in those regions were differentially affected by early and recent experiences. Early adverse life-events were associated with a relative reduction of the amygdala-hippocampal region and insula. Recent exposure to an adverse social environment was associated with changes in the posterior hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.These findings suggest that brain maturation between age 14 and 17 is particularly sensitive to adverse personal events early in life, and to adverse social events during adolescence. These findings open the way to understand how personal and social adverse events lead to alterations in social and emotional behavior inadults.

AB - The early developing brain has been shown to be sensitive to stress, but less is known about the impact of early-life stress on neural maturation during adolescence. Based on animal and human literature we hypothesized that stress may interfere with known patterns of neural development during adolescence, namely subcortical growth and prefrontal pruning. In a prospective longitudinal study, 37 adolescents were followed since 15 months of age. We tested the relative impact of adverse events experienced early in life (until age 5) and recently (between age 14 and 17), involving personal events and social environment on brainchanges occurring between age 14 and 17. Personal events were indexed with the Life Events Scale. Social environment was indexed with peer social preference. We focus on changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the amygdala-hippocampal complex and in prefrontal cortex. Preliminary results show that GMV changes in those regions were differentially affected by early and recent experiences. Early adverse life-events were associated with a relative reduction of the amygdala-hippocampal region and insula. Recent exposure to an adverse social environment was associated with changes in the posterior hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.These findings suggest that brain maturation between age 14 and 17 is particularly sensitive to adverse personal events early in life, and to adverse social events during adolescence. These findings open the way to understand how personal and social adverse events lead to alterations in social and emotional behavior inadults.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 40

EP - 41

ER -

Tyborowska A, Volman I, Niemann H, Pouwels L, Smeekens S, Cillessen A et al. Gray matter maturation is differentially influenced by early-life and pubertal stressful experiences: a prospective longitudinal study. 2016. Abstract from The 4th Annual Flux Congress, St. Louis, United States.