If it isn't finished at five, then I'll continue until it is: A qualitative study of work pressure among employees in vocational education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prolonged work pressure can contribute to burnout. The Job-Demands Resources model (the health impairment process and the roles of job and personal resources in it) provides a framework for studying work pressure.

OBJECTIVE: The study aims were to understand the experiences of employees in the career services and a teaching department of a school for vocational education regarding the following: A) work pressure; B) its negative consequences; and C) how job resources and D) personal resources play a role in the employees' experience of work pressure or in helping to cope with it.

METHODS: A qualitative study based on 11 in-depth interviews with teachers (5) and supporting personnel (6) was performed at a Dutch organization for vocational education. The interviews were analyzed interpretatively.

RESULTS: A) The teachers and supporting personnel generally experienced work pressure, which had both qualitative and quantitative aspects. B) The consequences included working overtime and lower job performance. Factors such as autonomy and social support from colleagues were C) job resources, and moving from idealism towards realism was D) a personal resource.

CONCLUSIONS: Both the teachers and supporting personnel who were interviewed experienced work pressure and its related consequences, as well as job and personal resources. Work pressure may threaten the sustainable employability of these employees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-80
Number of pages12
JournalWORK-A Journal of Prevention Assessment & Rehabilitation
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Vocational Education
Pressure
Interviews
Health Resources
Social Support
Teaching
Organizations

Keywords

  • BURNOUT
  • DEMANDS-RESOURCES MODEL
  • ENGAGEMENT
  • JOB DEMANDS
  • Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model
  • LEADERSHIP
  • STRAIN
  • STRESS
  • TEACHERS
  • job strain
  • job stress
  • workload

Cite this

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title = "If it isn't finished at five, then I'll continue until it is: A qualitative study of work pressure among employees in vocational education",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Prolonged work pressure can contribute to burnout. The Job-Demands Resources model (the health impairment process and the roles of job and personal resources in it) provides a framework for studying work pressure.OBJECTIVE: The study aims were to understand the experiences of employees in the career services and a teaching department of a school for vocational education regarding the following: A) work pressure; B) its negative consequences; and C) how job resources and D) personal resources play a role in the employees' experience of work pressure or in helping to cope with it.METHODS: A qualitative study based on 11 in-depth interviews with teachers (5) and supporting personnel (6) was performed at a Dutch organization for vocational education. The interviews were analyzed interpretatively.RESULTS: A) The teachers and supporting personnel generally experienced work pressure, which had both qualitative and quantitative aspects. B) The consequences included working overtime and lower job performance. Factors such as autonomy and social support from colleagues were C) job resources, and moving from idealism towards realism was D) a personal resource.CONCLUSIONS: Both the teachers and supporting personnel who were interviewed experienced work pressure and its related consequences, as well as job and personal resources. Work pressure may threaten the sustainable employability of these employees.",
keywords = "BURNOUT, DEMANDS-RESOURCES MODEL, ENGAGEMENT, JOB DEMANDS, Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model, LEADERSHIP, STRAIN, STRESS, TEACHERS, job strain, job stress, workload",
author = "{Stulemeijer - Hoefsmit}, N. and K. Cleef",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.3233/WOR-182780",
language = "English",
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pages = "69--80",
journal = "WORK-A Journal of Prevention Assessment & Rehabilitation",
issn = "1051-9815",
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N2 - BACKGROUND: Prolonged work pressure can contribute to burnout. The Job-Demands Resources model (the health impairment process and the roles of job and personal resources in it) provides a framework for studying work pressure.OBJECTIVE: The study aims were to understand the experiences of employees in the career services and a teaching department of a school for vocational education regarding the following: A) work pressure; B) its negative consequences; and C) how job resources and D) personal resources play a role in the employees' experience of work pressure or in helping to cope with it.METHODS: A qualitative study based on 11 in-depth interviews with teachers (5) and supporting personnel (6) was performed at a Dutch organization for vocational education. The interviews were analyzed interpretatively.RESULTS: A) The teachers and supporting personnel generally experienced work pressure, which had both qualitative and quantitative aspects. B) The consequences included working overtime and lower job performance. Factors such as autonomy and social support from colleagues were C) job resources, and moving from idealism towards realism was D) a personal resource.CONCLUSIONS: Both the teachers and supporting personnel who were interviewed experienced work pressure and its related consequences, as well as job and personal resources. Work pressure may threaten the sustainable employability of these employees.

AB - BACKGROUND: Prolonged work pressure can contribute to burnout. The Job-Demands Resources model (the health impairment process and the roles of job and personal resources in it) provides a framework for studying work pressure.OBJECTIVE: The study aims were to understand the experiences of employees in the career services and a teaching department of a school for vocational education regarding the following: A) work pressure; B) its negative consequences; and C) how job resources and D) personal resources play a role in the employees' experience of work pressure or in helping to cope with it.METHODS: A qualitative study based on 11 in-depth interviews with teachers (5) and supporting personnel (6) was performed at a Dutch organization for vocational education. The interviews were analyzed interpretatively.RESULTS: A) The teachers and supporting personnel generally experienced work pressure, which had both qualitative and quantitative aspects. B) The consequences included working overtime and lower job performance. Factors such as autonomy and social support from colleagues were C) job resources, and moving from idealism towards realism was D) a personal resource.CONCLUSIONS: Both the teachers and supporting personnel who were interviewed experienced work pressure and its related consequences, as well as job and personal resources. Work pressure may threaten the sustainable employability of these employees.

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