Institutional types and institutional change in healthcare ecosystems

Oana-Maria Pop, Sara Leroi-Werelds, A.H.W.M. Roijakkers, Tor W. Andreassen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to propose a typology of institutions enabling or constraining customer centricity and value co-creation in service ecosystems; illustrate the various types of institutions with examples from healthcare; and provide case study evidence on how pharmaceutical companies react to and induce institutional change.

Design/methodology/approach
First, a typology of institutions enabling or constraining customer centricity and value co-creation is proposed and illustrated with examples from healthcare. Next, to clarify how companies deal with these institutions by reacting to or inducing institutional change, two case companies from the pharmaceutical industry are described.

Findings
The research identifies and illustrates nine types of institutions (culture, structure, processes, metrics, language, practices, IP, legislation and general beliefs) grouped by three levels of analysis (micro, meso and macro). Furthermore, the findings of the two case studies indicate that companies react to, but also proactively induce, institutional change.

Research limitations/implications
The investigation is limited to two case studies.

Practical implications
Organizations need to understand the micro-, meso- and macro-level institutions of their service ecosystem; react to institutional changes imposed by other actors; and proactively change institutions by breaking, making or maintaining them.

Social implications
Pharmaceutical companies can improve patient well-being by inducing institutional change.

Originality/value
This research develops a mid-range theory of service ecosystem institutions by developing a typology. This typology is empirically examined in a healthcare context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)593-614
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Service Management
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

typology
Ecosystems
health care
ecosystem service
ecosystem
Industry
pharmaceutical industry
Drug products
Macros
legislation
drug
methodology
Institutional change
Ecosystem
Healthcare
Ecosystem services
Value co-creation

Keywords

  • Customer centricity
  • Institutions
  • Service-dominant logic
  • Service ecosystems

Cite this

Pop, Oana-Maria ; Leroi-Werelds, Sara ; Roijakkers, A.H.W.M. ; Andreassen, Tor W. / Institutional types and institutional change in healthcare ecosystems. In: Journal of Service Management. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 593-614.
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Institutional types and institutional change in healthcare ecosystems. / Pop, Oana-Maria; Leroi-Werelds, Sara; Roijakkers, A.H.W.M.; Andreassen, Tor W.

In: Journal of Service Management, Vol. 29, No. 4, 2018, p. 593-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Pop, Oana-Maria

AU - Leroi-Werelds, Sara

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AU - Andreassen, Tor W.

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N2 - PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to propose a typology of institutions enabling or constraining customer centricity and value co-creation in service ecosystems; illustrate the various types of institutions with examples from healthcare; and provide case study evidence on how pharmaceutical companies react to and induce institutional change.Design/methodology/approachFirst, a typology of institutions enabling or constraining customer centricity and value co-creation is proposed and illustrated with examples from healthcare. Next, to clarify how companies deal with these institutions by reacting to or inducing institutional change, two case companies from the pharmaceutical industry are described.FindingsThe research identifies and illustrates nine types of institutions (culture, structure, processes, metrics, language, practices, IP, legislation and general beliefs) grouped by three levels of analysis (micro, meso and macro). Furthermore, the findings of the two case studies indicate that companies react to, but also proactively induce, institutional change.Research limitations/implicationsThe investigation is limited to two case studies.Practical implicationsOrganizations need to understand the micro-, meso- and macro-level institutions of their service ecosystem; react to institutional changes imposed by other actors; and proactively change institutions by breaking, making or maintaining them.Social implicationsPharmaceutical companies can improve patient well-being by inducing institutional change.Originality/valueThis research develops a mid-range theory of service ecosystem institutions by developing a typology. This typology is empirically examined in a healthcare context.

AB - PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to propose a typology of institutions enabling or constraining customer centricity and value co-creation in service ecosystems; illustrate the various types of institutions with examples from healthcare; and provide case study evidence on how pharmaceutical companies react to and induce institutional change.Design/methodology/approachFirst, a typology of institutions enabling or constraining customer centricity and value co-creation is proposed and illustrated with examples from healthcare. Next, to clarify how companies deal with these institutions by reacting to or inducing institutional change, two case companies from the pharmaceutical industry are described.FindingsThe research identifies and illustrates nine types of institutions (culture, structure, processes, metrics, language, practices, IP, legislation and general beliefs) grouped by three levels of analysis (micro, meso and macro). Furthermore, the findings of the two case studies indicate that companies react to, but also proactively induce, institutional change.Research limitations/implicationsThe investigation is limited to two case studies.Practical implicationsOrganizations need to understand the micro-, meso- and macro-level institutions of their service ecosystem; react to institutional changes imposed by other actors; and proactively change institutions by breaking, making or maintaining them.Social implicationsPharmaceutical companies can improve patient well-being by inducing institutional change.Originality/valueThis research develops a mid-range theory of service ecosystem institutions by developing a typology. This typology is empirically examined in a healthcare context.

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