Job resources and emotional exhaustion

The mediating role of learning opportunities

J. Van Ruysseveldt*, P. Verboon, P. Smulders

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The Job Demands-Resources model predicts that job demands increase and job resources decrease emotional exhaustion in employees. In this study, we investigated one possible mechanism for this, in order to provide a deeper insight into the role of job resources in this energy-depletion process. We assumed that job resources (autonomy and task variety) reduce emotional exhaustion through the promotion of opportunities for personal growth and development, especially workplace learning. Moreover, we expected that job demands (workload, cognitive and emotional demands) would be positively related to work-related learning opportunities. Our research model was tested in a large and heterogeneous sample out of the Dutch working population (N = 4589), following a cross-validation procedure. Multi-group structural equation modelling revealed that autonomy and task variety promoted learning opportunities, which in turn partially mediated between these job resources and emotional exhaustion. With respect to job demands, our study showed mixed results: cognitive demands promoted learning opportunities, workload frustrated such opportunities, and emotional demands were not significantly related to learning opportunities. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between job demands, job resources and learning opportunities in the energy-depletion process, and support the need for the promotion of learning opportunities in the workplace. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]Copyright of Work & Stress is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-223
Number of pages19
JournalWork and Stress
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Learning
Workload
Workplace
Growth and Development
Research
Population

Keywords

  • ANALYSIS of variance
  • AUTONOMY (Psychology)
  • CHI-square test
  • Cognition
  • CONFIDENCE intervals
  • CORRELATION (Statistics)
  • EMPLOYMENT (Economic theory)
  • JOB descriptions
  • JOB stress
  • Learning
  • MATHEMATICAL models
  • PERSONNEL management
  • Probabilities
  • SCALE analysis (Psychology)
  • Surveys
  • EMPLOYEES -- Workload
  • Theory
  • JOB performance
  • SECONDARY analysis
  • EDUCATIONAL attainment
  • STRUCTURAL equation modeling
  • CROSS-sectional method
  • Netherlands
  • action theory
  • cognitive demands
  • Job Demands-Resources model
  • work-related stress
  • workload
  • workplace learning

Cite this

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title = "Job resources and emotional exhaustion: The mediating role of learning opportunities",
abstract = "The Job Demands-Resources model predicts that job demands increase and job resources decrease emotional exhaustion in employees. In this study, we investigated one possible mechanism for this, in order to provide a deeper insight into the role of job resources in this energy-depletion process. We assumed that job resources (autonomy and task variety) reduce emotional exhaustion through the promotion of opportunities for personal growth and development, especially workplace learning. Moreover, we expected that job demands (workload, cognitive and emotional demands) would be positively related to work-related learning opportunities. Our research model was tested in a large and heterogeneous sample out of the Dutch working population (N = 4589), following a cross-validation procedure. Multi-group structural equation modelling revealed that autonomy and task variety promoted learning opportunities, which in turn partially mediated between these job resources and emotional exhaustion. With respect to job demands, our study showed mixed results: cognitive demands promoted learning opportunities, workload frustrated such opportunities, and emotional demands were not significantly related to learning opportunities. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between job demands, job resources and learning opportunities in the energy-depletion process, and support the need for the promotion of learning opportunities in the workplace. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]Copyright of Work & Stress is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)",
keywords = "ANALYSIS of variance, AUTONOMY (Psychology), CHI-square test, Cognition, CONFIDENCE intervals, CORRELATION (Statistics), EMPLOYMENT (Economic theory), JOB descriptions, JOB stress, Learning, MATHEMATICAL models, PERSONNEL management, Probabilities, SCALE analysis (Psychology), Surveys, EMPLOYEES -- Workload, Theory, JOB performance, SECONDARY analysis, EDUCATIONAL attainment, STRUCTURAL equation modeling, CROSS-sectional method, Netherlands, action theory, cognitive demands, Job Demands-Resources model, work-related stress, workload, workplace learning",
author = "{Van Ruysseveldt}, J. and P. Verboon and P. Smulders",
note = "Article02678373Accession Number: 65928012; Van Ruysseveldt, Joris 1; Email Address: joris.vanruysseveldt@ou.nl Verboon, Peter 1 Smulders, Peter 2; Affiliation: 1: Department of Psychology, Open University of the Netherlands, The Netherlands 2: TNO Quality of Working Life, TNO, The Netherlands; Source Info: Jul-Sep2011, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p205; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: AUTONOMY (Psychology); Subject Term: CHI-square test; Subject Term: COGNITION; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: CORRELATION (Statistics); Subject Term: EMPLOYMENT (Economic theory); Subject Term: JOB descriptions; Subject Term: JOB stress; Subject Term: LEARNING; Subject Term: MATHEMATICAL models; Subject Term: PERSONNEL management; Subject Term: PROBABILITIES; Subject Term: SCALE analysis (Psychology); Subject Term: SURVEYS; Subject Term: EMPLOYEES -- Workload; Subject Term: THEORY; Subject Term: JOB performance; Subject Term: SECONDARY analysis; Subject Term: EDUCATIONAL attainment; Subject Term: STRUCTURAL equation modeling; Subject Term: CROSS-sectional method; Subject Term: NETHERLANDS; Author-Supplied Keyword: action theory; Author-Supplied Keyword: cognitive demands; Author-Supplied Keyword: Job Demands-Resources model; Author-Supplied Keyword: work-related stress; Author-Supplied Keyword: workload; Author-Supplied Keyword: workplace learning; NAICS/Industry Codes: 541612 Human Resources Consulting Services; NAICS/Industry Codes: 923130 Administration of Human Resource Programs (except Education, Public Health, and Veterans' Affairs Programs); Number of Pages: 19p; Document Type: Article",
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language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "205--223",
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}

Job resources and emotional exhaustion : The mediating role of learning opportunities. / Van Ruysseveldt, J.; Verboon, P.; Smulders, P.

In: Work and Stress, Vol. 25, No. 3, 2011, p. 205-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Job resources and emotional exhaustion

T2 - The mediating role of learning opportunities

AU - Van Ruysseveldt, J.

AU - Verboon, P.

AU - Smulders, P.

N1 - Article02678373Accession Number: 65928012; Van Ruysseveldt, Joris 1; Email Address: joris.vanruysseveldt@ou.nl Verboon, Peter 1 Smulders, Peter 2; Affiliation: 1: Department of Psychology, Open University of the Netherlands, The Netherlands 2: TNO Quality of Working Life, TNO, The Netherlands; Source Info: Jul-Sep2011, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p205; Subject Term: ANALYSIS of variance; Subject Term: AUTONOMY (Psychology); Subject Term: CHI-square test; Subject Term: COGNITION; Subject Term: CONFIDENCE intervals; Subject Term: CORRELATION (Statistics); Subject Term: EMPLOYMENT (Economic theory); Subject Term: JOB descriptions; Subject Term: JOB stress; Subject Term: LEARNING; Subject Term: MATHEMATICAL models; Subject Term: PERSONNEL management; Subject Term: PROBABILITIES; Subject Term: SCALE analysis (Psychology); Subject Term: SURVEYS; Subject Term: EMPLOYEES -- Workload; Subject Term: THEORY; Subject Term: JOB performance; Subject Term: SECONDARY analysis; Subject Term: EDUCATIONAL attainment; Subject Term: STRUCTURAL equation modeling; Subject Term: CROSS-sectional method; Subject Term: NETHERLANDS; Author-Supplied Keyword: action theory; Author-Supplied Keyword: cognitive demands; Author-Supplied Keyword: Job Demands-Resources model; Author-Supplied Keyword: work-related stress; Author-Supplied Keyword: workload; Author-Supplied Keyword: workplace learning; NAICS/Industry Codes: 541612 Human Resources Consulting Services; NAICS/Industry Codes: 923130 Administration of Human Resource Programs (except Education, Public Health, and Veterans' Affairs Programs); Number of Pages: 19p; Document Type: Article

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - The Job Demands-Resources model predicts that job demands increase and job resources decrease emotional exhaustion in employees. In this study, we investigated one possible mechanism for this, in order to provide a deeper insight into the role of job resources in this energy-depletion process. We assumed that job resources (autonomy and task variety) reduce emotional exhaustion through the promotion of opportunities for personal growth and development, especially workplace learning. Moreover, we expected that job demands (workload, cognitive and emotional demands) would be positively related to work-related learning opportunities. Our research model was tested in a large and heterogeneous sample out of the Dutch working population (N = 4589), following a cross-validation procedure. Multi-group structural equation modelling revealed that autonomy and task variety promoted learning opportunities, which in turn partially mediated between these job resources and emotional exhaustion. With respect to job demands, our study showed mixed results: cognitive demands promoted learning opportunities, workload frustrated such opportunities, and emotional demands were not significantly related to learning opportunities. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between job demands, job resources and learning opportunities in the energy-depletion process, and support the need for the promotion of learning opportunities in the workplace. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]Copyright of Work & Stress is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

AB - The Job Demands-Resources model predicts that job demands increase and job resources decrease emotional exhaustion in employees. In this study, we investigated one possible mechanism for this, in order to provide a deeper insight into the role of job resources in this energy-depletion process. We assumed that job resources (autonomy and task variety) reduce emotional exhaustion through the promotion of opportunities for personal growth and development, especially workplace learning. Moreover, we expected that job demands (workload, cognitive and emotional demands) would be positively related to work-related learning opportunities. Our research model was tested in a large and heterogeneous sample out of the Dutch working population (N = 4589), following a cross-validation procedure. Multi-group structural equation modelling revealed that autonomy and task variety promoted learning opportunities, which in turn partially mediated between these job resources and emotional exhaustion. With respect to job demands, our study showed mixed results: cognitive demands promoted learning opportunities, workload frustrated such opportunities, and emotional demands were not significantly related to learning opportunities. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between job demands, job resources and learning opportunities in the energy-depletion process, and support the need for the promotion of learning opportunities in the workplace. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]Copyright of Work & Stress is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

KW - ANALYSIS of variance

KW - AUTONOMY (Psychology)

KW - CHI-square test

KW - Cognition

KW - CONFIDENCE intervals

KW - CORRELATION (Statistics)

KW - EMPLOYMENT (Economic theory)

KW - JOB descriptions

KW - JOB stress

KW - Learning

KW - MATHEMATICAL models

KW - PERSONNEL management

KW - Probabilities

KW - SCALE analysis (Psychology)

KW - Surveys

KW - EMPLOYEES -- Workload

KW - Theory

KW - JOB performance

KW - SECONDARY analysis

KW - EDUCATIONAL attainment

KW - STRUCTURAL equation modeling

KW - CROSS-sectional method

KW - Netherlands

KW - action theory

KW - cognitive demands

KW - Job Demands-Resources model

KW - work-related stress

KW - workload

KW - workplace learning

U2 - 10.1080/02678373.2011.613223

DO - 10.1080/02678373.2011.613223

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 205

EP - 223

JO - Work and Stress

JF - Work and Stress

SN - 0267-8373

IS - 3

ER -