Keep the expert! Occupational expertise, perceived employability and job search: A study across age groups

Ans De Vos*, Anneleen Forrier, B.I.J.M. van der Heijden, Nele De Cuyper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: In the current war for talent employers are concerned about the idea that the best employees are more likely to leave the organization for another employer (i.e. the management paradox). This study tests this management paradox. The purpose of this paper is to advance our understandings of how employees’ occupational expertise is associated with job search intensity, through its assumed relationships with perceived internal and external employability in the internal and the external labor market. The authors thereby tested the research model across three different age groups (young, middle-aged, and senior employees).
Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted a survey among 2,137 professional workers and applied multi-group structural equation modeling.
Findings: Perceived internal employability negatively mediated the relationship between occupational expertise and job search intensity, whilst there was a positive mediational effect of perceived external employability. Age had a moderating effect on the association between perceived internal employability and job search intensity.
Research limitations/implications: The findings contribute to the scholarly literature on the management paradox, and the empirical work on employability and age.
Practical implications: Organizations can recoup their investments in expert workers’ employability and enhance their retention by providing opportunities for internal career development.
Originality/value: This study is original by including both internal and external employability. By doing so, the authors thereby shedding new light on how occupational expertise might explain job search and how this relationship differs depending on employee age, thereby using a large sample of respondents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)318-332
Number of pages15
JournalCareer Development International
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2017

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job search
employability
age group
expertise
expert
employee
employer
management
worker
Age groups
Expertise
Employability
Job search
Perceived employability
labor market
career
organization
Employees
methodology

Cite this

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title = "Keep the expert! Occupational expertise, perceived employability and job search: A study across age groups",
abstract = "Purpose: In the current war for talent employers are concerned about the idea that the best employees are more likely to leave the organization for another employer (i.e. the management paradox). This study tests this management paradox. The purpose of this paper is to advance our understandings of how employees’ occupational expertise is associated with job search intensity, through its assumed relationships with perceived internal and external employability in the internal and the external labor market. The authors thereby tested the research model across three different age groups (young, middle-aged, and senior employees).Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted a survey among 2,137 professional workers and applied multi-group structural equation modeling.Findings: Perceived internal employability negatively mediated the relationship between occupational expertise and job search intensity, whilst there was a positive mediational effect of perceived external employability. Age had a moderating effect on the association between perceived internal employability and job search intensity.Research limitations/implications: The findings contribute to the scholarly literature on the management paradox, and the empirical work on employability and age.Practical implications: Organizations can recoup their investments in expert workers’ employability and enhance their retention by providing opportunities for internal career development.Originality/value: This study is original by including both internal and external employability. By doing so, the authors thereby shedding new light on how occupational expertise might explain job search and how this relationship differs depending on employee age, thereby using a large sample of respondents.",
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Keep the expert! Occupational expertise, perceived employability and job search : A study across age groups. / De Vos, Ans; Forrier, Anneleen; van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.; De Cuyper, Nele.

In: Career Development International, Vol. 22, No. 3, 12.06.2017, p. 318-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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