Keeping up with the pace of change: A recipient-centred perspective on change and its outcomes

I.D. Nikolova, J.P. de Jong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We discuss organizational change (OC) events from the recipient’s perspective and we stipulate that these events account for a range of different learning and well-being outcomes. We offer a typology of change derived from two facets of employee change experiences: frequency and impact. We propose that each change event can trigger different learning and stress-related outcomes and we offer a theoretical rationale explaining why we deem likely that each change event will be associated with specific outcomes. We further theorize that time will play a significant role in how change affects employees, and we suggest that the duration of the exposure to change (in addition to the change frequency and impact) will largely account for employee change experiences and change-related outcomes. In addition, we discuss how the sequence of occurrence of change events and the prior change experiences (i.e., the recipient’s evaluation of the prior change experience as rather positive or negative) may determine how current change events will be approached. We conclude the chapter by elaborating on the challenges that lie ahead and we propose avenues for future research based on the theoretical propositions made in this contribution.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook on the Temporal Dynamics of Organizational Behavior
EditorsYannick Griep, Samantha D. Hansen
Place of PublicationCheltenham, UK
PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
Chapter3
Pages45-61
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781788974387
ISBN (Print)9781788974370
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 May 2020

Publication series

SeriesResearch Handbooks in Business and Management series

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