Literatuur, politiek en recht in Nederland, 1945-1952: De zuivering van het literaire veld door de Ereraad voor de Letterkunde en de Centrale Ereraad voor de Kunst

Translated title of the contribution: Literature, politics and law in the Netherlands, 1945-1952: The purge of the literary field by the Board of Honor for the Letters and the Central Board of Honor for the Arts

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Abstract

During the occupation of the Netherlands by Nazi Germany, the Dutch literary field was drastically restructured and politicized. Immediately after the liberation, efforts were made to rebuild the field. The first step that was made in the reconstruction, was to purge the field of collaborators. This purge was carried out by the Board of Honour for the Letters and the Central Board of Honour for the Arts. This article investigates just how these Boards contributed to the reconstruction of a(n) (relatively) autonomous literary field in the Netherlands. In doing so, it takes recourse to historical sociological theories regarding the legal and deontological responsibility of the writer.
Translated title of the contributionLiterature, politics and law in the Netherlands, 1945-1952: The purge of the literary field by the Board of Honor for the Letters and the Central Board of Honor for the Arts
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)135-166
Number of pages32
JournalNederlandse Letterkunde
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Board of Honour for the Letters (Ereraad voor de Letterkunde); Central Board of Honour for the Arts (Centrale Ereraad voor de Kunst); Purge of Artists Act (G.84) (Wet Zuivering Kunstenaars (G.84)); WWII; deontological responsibility of the writer; legal responsibility of the writer; literary autonomy

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