Long-Term Effects on Loneliness of a Computer-Tailored Intervention for Older Adults With Chronic Diseases: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Abstract

Objectives: This study explores the effects of the Active Plus intervention aiming to decrease loneliness among older adults (>65 years) with chronic diseases. Methods: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed (N = 585; age: M = 74.5 years, SD = 6.4), assessing loneliness at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Outcome measures in the multilevel linear regression analyses were total, social and emotional loneliness. Results: At 12 months, significant decreases in total (B = -.37, p = .01) and social loneliness (B = -.24, p = .02) were found. Age was a significant moderator for total and social loneliness; however, the intervention was effective only for participants aged 80 years and older. Discussion: The Active Plus intervention showed a significant decrease in total and social loneliness and was especially beneficial for the vulnerable age group of 80 years and older. A more comprehensive tool for measuring social activity and mobility impairments, and using a longer time frame to detect loneliness changes, may form interesting future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 May 2021

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