Longitudinal patterns of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and their associations with work-related learning outcomes

Anne van Hootegem, I.D. Nikolova, Hans De Witte, Eva Kyndt, J.M.E. Van Ruysseveldt, K. van Dam

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Purpose. Previous research has demonstrated that long-term patterns of job insecurity (JI) may differently relate to outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of JI, taking into account quantitative as well as qualitative JI, and to examine how these relate to work-related learning (WRL).
Method. We conducted latent class growth analysis using three-wave data of 1013 Dutch employees. ANCOVAs for repeated measures were used to associate the trajectories to the outcomes.
Results. Five patterns of quantitative and qualitative JI were identified: (1) high stable (n = 102), (2) low stable (n = 436), (3) very low stable (n = 148), (4) decreasing (n = 258) and (5) increasing (n = 69). In every class, the change pattern was similar for quantitative and qualitative JI. The trajectories differed in the WRL outcomes that were examined. Those in the high stable JI had lower stable levels of occupational self-efficacy, acquired knowledge and skills, and learning from supervisor and colleagues than those with low stable levels of JI. Additionally, an increase in JI was associated with a decrease in learning from supervisor and colleagues and vice versa.
Limitations. Additional measurement points would have allowed for a more refined analysis of JI trajectories.
Implications. The findings indicate that there are distinct trajectories of quantitative and qualitative JI, and that these display a substantial amount of heterogeneity in terms of WRL.
Originality. This study was the first to combine quantitative and
Original languageEnglish
Pages513-514
Publication statusPublished - May 2019
Event19th EAWOP Congress: Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society - Lingotto Conference Centre, Turin, Italy
Duration: 29 May 20191 Jun 2019
Conference number: 19
https://eawop2019.org/

Conference

Conference19th EAWOP Congress
Abbreviated titleEAWOP 2019
CountryItaly
CityTurin
Period29/05/191/06/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

learning
self-efficacy
employee

Keywords

  • job insecurity; workplace learning; latent class growth analysis

Cite this

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title = "Longitudinal patterns of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and their associations with work-related learning outcomes",
abstract = "Purpose. Previous research has demonstrated that long-term patterns of job insecurity (JI) may differently relate to outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of JI, taking into account quantitative as well as qualitative JI, and to examine how these relate to work-related learning (WRL). Method. We conducted latent class growth analysis using three-wave data of 1013 Dutch employees. ANCOVAs for repeated measures were used to associate the trajectories to the outcomes.Results. Five patterns of quantitative and qualitative JI were identified: (1) high stable (n = 102), (2) low stable (n = 436), (3) very low stable (n = 148), (4) decreasing (n = 258) and (5) increasing (n = 69). In every class, the change pattern was similar for quantitative and qualitative JI. The trajectories differed in the WRL outcomes that were examined. Those in the high stable JI had lower stable levels of occupational self-efficacy, acquired knowledge and skills, and learning from supervisor and colleagues than those with low stable levels of JI. Additionally, an increase in JI was associated with a decrease in learning from supervisor and colleagues and vice versa.Limitations. Additional measurement points would have allowed for a more refined analysis of JI trajectories.Implications. The findings indicate that there are distinct trajectories of quantitative and qualitative JI, and that these display a substantial amount of heterogeneity in terms of WRL.Originality. This study was the first to combine quantitative and",
keywords = "job insecurity; workplace learning; latent class growth analysis",
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Longitudinal patterns of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and their associations with work-related learning outcomes. / van Hootegem, Anne; Nikolova, I.D.; De Witte, Hans; Kyndt, Eva; Van Ruysseveldt, J.M.E.; van Dam, K.

2019. 513-514 Abstract from 19th EAWOP Congress, Turin, Italy.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Longitudinal patterns of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity and their associations with work-related learning outcomes

AU - van Hootegem, Anne

AU - Nikolova, I.D.

AU - De Witte, Hans

AU - Kyndt, Eva

AU - Van Ruysseveldt, J.M.E.

AU - van Dam, K.

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Purpose. Previous research has demonstrated that long-term patterns of job insecurity (JI) may differently relate to outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of JI, taking into account quantitative as well as qualitative JI, and to examine how these relate to work-related learning (WRL). Method. We conducted latent class growth analysis using three-wave data of 1013 Dutch employees. ANCOVAs for repeated measures were used to associate the trajectories to the outcomes.Results. Five patterns of quantitative and qualitative JI were identified: (1) high stable (n = 102), (2) low stable (n = 436), (3) very low stable (n = 148), (4) decreasing (n = 258) and (5) increasing (n = 69). In every class, the change pattern was similar for quantitative and qualitative JI. The trajectories differed in the WRL outcomes that were examined. Those in the high stable JI had lower stable levels of occupational self-efficacy, acquired knowledge and skills, and learning from supervisor and colleagues than those with low stable levels of JI. Additionally, an increase in JI was associated with a decrease in learning from supervisor and colleagues and vice versa.Limitations. Additional measurement points would have allowed for a more refined analysis of JI trajectories.Implications. The findings indicate that there are distinct trajectories of quantitative and qualitative JI, and that these display a substantial amount of heterogeneity in terms of WRL.Originality. This study was the first to combine quantitative and

AB - Purpose. Previous research has demonstrated that long-term patterns of job insecurity (JI) may differently relate to outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of JI, taking into account quantitative as well as qualitative JI, and to examine how these relate to work-related learning (WRL). Method. We conducted latent class growth analysis using three-wave data of 1013 Dutch employees. ANCOVAs for repeated measures were used to associate the trajectories to the outcomes.Results. Five patterns of quantitative and qualitative JI were identified: (1) high stable (n = 102), (2) low stable (n = 436), (3) very low stable (n = 148), (4) decreasing (n = 258) and (5) increasing (n = 69). In every class, the change pattern was similar for quantitative and qualitative JI. The trajectories differed in the WRL outcomes that were examined. Those in the high stable JI had lower stable levels of occupational self-efficacy, acquired knowledge and skills, and learning from supervisor and colleagues than those with low stable levels of JI. Additionally, an increase in JI was associated with a decrease in learning from supervisor and colleagues and vice versa.Limitations. Additional measurement points would have allowed for a more refined analysis of JI trajectories.Implications. The findings indicate that there are distinct trajectories of quantitative and qualitative JI, and that these display a substantial amount of heterogeneity in terms of WRL.Originality. This study was the first to combine quantitative and

KW - job insecurity; workplace learning; latent class growth analysis

M3 - Abstract

SP - 513

EP - 514

ER -