Performance-based contracting in military supply chains and the willingness to bear risks

Jeroen van Strien, C. Gelderman*, J. Semeijn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose
Performance-based contracting (PBC) plays an increasingly important role in the defense industry. This study investigated the factors that influence the service provider’s willingness to accept PBC-induced risks. It also shows how these risks could be managed in a military service supply chain.

Design/methodology
The case study focused on the relationship between a service provider and a customer that acted on behalf of other users in the defense sector. The contract involved the sustainment of a military engine in a complex supply chain.

Findings
The service provider’s performance attributability appeared to have a strong impact on its willingness to take PBC-induced risks. For the parts where the service provider did not have full control over the service performance, exclusions and Service Level Agreements (SLAs) were used to manage and mitigate the risks associated with uncontrolled performance. The service provider’s willingness to accept PBC induced risks was also affected by its ability to make accurate forecasts, the applied growth path and the length of the contract.

Research limitations/implications
This case has specific characteristics, unique by time (maturity of the technical system and supply chain) and place (market). It is recommended that results are tested in other research settings.

Practical implications
Organizations should be aware of the factors that influence a service provider’s willingness to bear PBC induced risks. Customers should limit PBC to those parts of a contract where risks are of an acceptable level. Also, it is recommended to follow a phased growth path when it is not possible to make accurate forecasts in a PBC context.

Originality/value
This study is the first to address critical issues concerning the identification and management of risks under PBC in the defense industry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-107
Number of pages25
JournalThe Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Willingness
Contracting
Performance-based contracting
Military
Supply chain
Service provider
Willingness to accept
Influence factors
Defense industry
Exclusion
Defence sector
Service performance
Maturity
Service level agreement

Keywords

  • Service supply chains, Agency theory, Risk management, Defense, Performance-based contracting (PBC), Service industries

Cite this

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title = "Performance-based contracting in military supply chains and the willingness to bear risks",
abstract = "PurposePerformance-based contracting (PBC) plays an increasingly important role in the defense industry. This study investigated the factors that influence the service provider’s willingness to accept PBC-induced risks. It also shows how these risks could be managed in a military service supply chain.Design/methodologyThe case study focused on the relationship between a service provider and a customer that acted on behalf of other users in the defense sector. The contract involved the sustainment of a military engine in a complex supply chain.FindingsThe service provider’s performance attributability appeared to have a strong impact on its willingness to take PBC-induced risks. For the parts where the service provider did not have full control over the service performance, exclusions and Service Level Agreements (SLAs) were used to manage and mitigate the risks associated with uncontrolled performance. The service provider’s willingness to accept PBC induced risks was also affected by its ability to make accurate forecasts, the applied growth path and the length of the contract.Research limitations/implicationsThis case has specific characteristics, unique by time (maturity of the technical system and supply chain) and place (market). It is recommended that results are tested in other research settings.Practical implicationsOrganizations should be aware of the factors that influence a service provider’s willingness to bear PBC induced risks. Customers should limit PBC to those parts of a contract where risks are of an acceptable level. Also, it is recommended to follow a phased growth path when it is not possible to make accurate forecasts in a PBC context. Originality/valueThis study is the first to address critical issues concerning the identification and management of risks under PBC in the defense industry.",
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Performance-based contracting in military supply chains and the willingness to bear risks. / van Strien, Jeroen; Gelderman, C.; Semeijn, J.

In: The Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, Vol. 3, No. 1, 20.06.2019, p. 83-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Performance-based contracting in military supply chains and the willingness to bear risks

AU - van Strien, Jeroen

AU - Gelderman, C.

AU - Semeijn, J.

PY - 2019/6/20

Y1 - 2019/6/20

N2 - PurposePerformance-based contracting (PBC) plays an increasingly important role in the defense industry. This study investigated the factors that influence the service provider’s willingness to accept PBC-induced risks. It also shows how these risks could be managed in a military service supply chain.Design/methodologyThe case study focused on the relationship between a service provider and a customer that acted on behalf of other users in the defense sector. The contract involved the sustainment of a military engine in a complex supply chain.FindingsThe service provider’s performance attributability appeared to have a strong impact on its willingness to take PBC-induced risks. For the parts where the service provider did not have full control over the service performance, exclusions and Service Level Agreements (SLAs) were used to manage and mitigate the risks associated with uncontrolled performance. The service provider’s willingness to accept PBC induced risks was also affected by its ability to make accurate forecasts, the applied growth path and the length of the contract.Research limitations/implicationsThis case has specific characteristics, unique by time (maturity of the technical system and supply chain) and place (market). It is recommended that results are tested in other research settings.Practical implicationsOrganizations should be aware of the factors that influence a service provider’s willingness to bear PBC induced risks. Customers should limit PBC to those parts of a contract where risks are of an acceptable level. Also, it is recommended to follow a phased growth path when it is not possible to make accurate forecasts in a PBC context. Originality/valueThis study is the first to address critical issues concerning the identification and management of risks under PBC in the defense industry.

AB - PurposePerformance-based contracting (PBC) plays an increasingly important role in the defense industry. This study investigated the factors that influence the service provider’s willingness to accept PBC-induced risks. It also shows how these risks could be managed in a military service supply chain.Design/methodologyThe case study focused on the relationship between a service provider and a customer that acted on behalf of other users in the defense sector. The contract involved the sustainment of a military engine in a complex supply chain.FindingsThe service provider’s performance attributability appeared to have a strong impact on its willingness to take PBC-induced risks. For the parts where the service provider did not have full control over the service performance, exclusions and Service Level Agreements (SLAs) were used to manage and mitigate the risks associated with uncontrolled performance. The service provider’s willingness to accept PBC induced risks was also affected by its ability to make accurate forecasts, the applied growth path and the length of the contract.Research limitations/implicationsThis case has specific characteristics, unique by time (maturity of the technical system and supply chain) and place (market). It is recommended that results are tested in other research settings.Practical implicationsOrganizations should be aware of the factors that influence a service provider’s willingness to bear PBC induced risks. Customers should limit PBC to those parts of a contract where risks are of an acceptable level. Also, it is recommended to follow a phased growth path when it is not possible to make accurate forecasts in a PBC context. Originality/valueThis study is the first to address critical issues concerning the identification and management of risks under PBC in the defense industry.

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JO - The Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics

JF - The Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics

SN - 2399-6439

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ER -