Positive organizational change: The role of sense making and emotion regulation for adaptive performance

K. van Dam, Cornelia Niessen

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Purpose: Research has generally emphasized the negative impact of organizational change for employees’ change responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conditions (i.e. job control and team climate) that might stimulate employees’ sense making (i.e. seeing their job as a meaningful contribution to the organization) and emotion regulation, and, in turn, their adaptive performance during change.
Design/Methodology: A total of 273 employees, in situations of organizational change, completed surveys on 2 occasions. We used a time lag of two months between our two data collections because we wanted to measure predictor variables and criteria separately in order to reduce common method bias.
Results: Structural equation modeling showed that job control and team climate were positively related to sense making, which predicted emotion regulation. In turn, emotion regulation was a strong predictor of adaptive behaviour during the change.
Limitations: The study is limited because of the issue of causality, and the self-reported nature of the measures.
Implications: By providing a positive work environment, organizations may increase employees’ perception that their work matters. This sense making can serve as a positive force in times of organizational change, and can help strengthen employee adaptability to change.
Originality/Value: Whereas much previous research had pointed at the negative outcomes of organizational change, this study focused on the positive side of change processes by showing that positive work conditions can enhance employee adaptive performance.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2019
Event19th EAWOP Congress: Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society - Lingotto Conference Centre, Turin, Italy
Duration: 29 May 20191 Jun 2019
Conference number: 19
https://eawop2019.org/

Conference

Conference19th EAWOP Congress
Abbreviated titleEAWOP 2019
CountryItaly
CityTurin
Period29/05/191/06/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Organizational change
Emotion regulation
Employees
Sensemaking
Predictors
Job control
Climate
Work conditions
Data collection
Design methodology
Adaptive behavior
Structural equation modeling
Change process
Causality
Time lag
Performance change
Work environment
Employee perceptions
Adaptability

Keywords

  • organizational change, sensemaking, adaptive behavior, team climate, job control

Cite this

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title = "Positive organizational change: The role of sense making and emotion regulation for adaptive performance",
abstract = "Purpose: Research has generally emphasized the negative impact of organizational change for employees’ change responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conditions (i.e. job control and team climate) that might stimulate employees’ sense making (i.e. seeing their job as a meaningful contribution to the organization) and emotion regulation, and, in turn, their adaptive performance during change. Design/Methodology: A total of 273 employees, in situations of organizational change, completed surveys on 2 occasions. We used a time lag of two months between our two data collections because we wanted to measure predictor variables and criteria separately in order to reduce common method bias. Results: Structural equation modeling showed that job control and team climate were positively related to sense making, which predicted emotion regulation. In turn, emotion regulation was a strong predictor of adaptive behaviour during the change. Limitations: The study is limited because of the issue of causality, and the self-reported nature of the measures. Implications: By providing a positive work environment, organizations may increase employees’ perception that their work matters. This sense making can serve as a positive force in times of organizational change, and can help strengthen employee adaptability to change. Originality/Value: Whereas much previous research had pointed at the negative outcomes of organizational change, this study focused on the positive side of change processes by showing that positive work conditions can enhance employee adaptive performance.",
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van Dam, K & Niessen, C 2019, 'Positive organizational change: The role of sense making and emotion regulation for adaptive performance' 19th EAWOP Congress, Turin, Italy, 29/05/19 - 1/06/19, .

Positive organizational change : The role of sense making and emotion regulation for adaptive performance. / van Dam, K.; Niessen, Cornelia.

2019. Abstract from 19th EAWOP Congress, Turin, Italy.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Positive organizational change

T2 - The role of sense making and emotion regulation for adaptive performance

AU - van Dam, K.

AU - Niessen, Cornelia

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Purpose: Research has generally emphasized the negative impact of organizational change for employees’ change responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conditions (i.e. job control and team climate) that might stimulate employees’ sense making (i.e. seeing their job as a meaningful contribution to the organization) and emotion regulation, and, in turn, their adaptive performance during change. Design/Methodology: A total of 273 employees, in situations of organizational change, completed surveys on 2 occasions. We used a time lag of two months between our two data collections because we wanted to measure predictor variables and criteria separately in order to reduce common method bias. Results: Structural equation modeling showed that job control and team climate were positively related to sense making, which predicted emotion regulation. In turn, emotion regulation was a strong predictor of adaptive behaviour during the change. Limitations: The study is limited because of the issue of causality, and the self-reported nature of the measures. Implications: By providing a positive work environment, organizations may increase employees’ perception that their work matters. This sense making can serve as a positive force in times of organizational change, and can help strengthen employee adaptability to change. Originality/Value: Whereas much previous research had pointed at the negative outcomes of organizational change, this study focused on the positive side of change processes by showing that positive work conditions can enhance employee adaptive performance.

AB - Purpose: Research has generally emphasized the negative impact of organizational change for employees’ change responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conditions (i.e. job control and team climate) that might stimulate employees’ sense making (i.e. seeing their job as a meaningful contribution to the organization) and emotion regulation, and, in turn, their adaptive performance during change. Design/Methodology: A total of 273 employees, in situations of organizational change, completed surveys on 2 occasions. We used a time lag of two months between our two data collections because we wanted to measure predictor variables and criteria separately in order to reduce common method bias. Results: Structural equation modeling showed that job control and team climate were positively related to sense making, which predicted emotion regulation. In turn, emotion regulation was a strong predictor of adaptive behaviour during the change. Limitations: The study is limited because of the issue of causality, and the self-reported nature of the measures. Implications: By providing a positive work environment, organizations may increase employees’ perception that their work matters. This sense making can serve as a positive force in times of organizational change, and can help strengthen employee adaptability to change. Originality/Value: Whereas much previous research had pointed at the negative outcomes of organizational change, this study focused on the positive side of change processes by showing that positive work conditions can enhance employee adaptive performance.

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M3 - Abstract

ER -