Redox-Related Mechanisms to Rebalance Cancer-Deregulated Cell Growth

An-Sofie Stevens, Nicky Pirotte, Annelies Wouters, Andromeda Van Roten, Frank Van Belleghem, Maxime Willems, Ann Cuypers, Tom Artois, Karen Smeets*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

A delicate balance exists between the process of carcinogenesis and tissue regeneration. A number of malignant tumours are considered the outcome of an impaired or incomplete regeneration process, resulting in persistently dividing cells. Regeneration-competent tissues and animals are able to prevent and counteract growth abnormalities and seem to have a low vulnerability to chemical carcinogenesis. Cancer cell survival depends, among other things, on various redox-related mechanisms, which are targets of currently developed therapies. Disadvantages of these therapies are a lack of specificity and drug resistance. As the majority of these redox-related mechanisms also play an important role in successful and coordinated cell functioning and reproduction, the regeneration process offers a unique parallel context for modern cancer research. This review focuses on the interconnections between regeneration and carcinogenesis and how an understanding of regenerative forces and redox-controlled mechanisms could contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets to block the growth and survival of cancer cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1414-1437
Number of pages24
JournalCurrent Drug Targets
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Anticarcinogenic therapies
  • carcinogenesis
  • redox-related mechanisms
  • regeneration
  • stem cells
  • NF-KAPPA-B
  • EPITHELIAL-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION
  • OXYGEN SPECIES ACCUMULATION
  • AXON REGENERATION REQUIRES
  • INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1-ALPHA
  • INHIBITS TUMOR-GROWTH
  • OXIDATIVE STRESS
  • BREAST-CANCER
  • STEM-CELLS
  • PLANARIAN REGENERATION

Cite this

Stevens, A-S., Pirotte, N., Wouters, A., Van Roten, A., Van Belleghem, F., Willems, M., ... Smeets, K. (2016). Redox-Related Mechanisms to Rebalance Cancer-Deregulated Cell Growth. Current Drug Targets, 17(12), 1414-1437. https://doi.org/10.2174/1389450116666150506112817
Stevens, An-Sofie ; Pirotte, Nicky ; Wouters, Annelies ; Van Roten, Andromeda ; Van Belleghem, Frank ; Willems, Maxime ; Cuypers, Ann ; Artois, Tom ; Smeets, Karen. / Redox-Related Mechanisms to Rebalance Cancer-Deregulated Cell Growth. In: Current Drug Targets. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 12. pp. 1414-1437.
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abstract = "A delicate balance exists between the process of carcinogenesis and tissue regeneration. A number of malignant tumours are considered the outcome of an impaired or incomplete regeneration process, resulting in persistently dividing cells. Regeneration-competent tissues and animals are able to prevent and counteract growth abnormalities and seem to have a low vulnerability to chemical carcinogenesis. Cancer cell survival depends, among other things, on various redox-related mechanisms, which are targets of currently developed therapies. Disadvantages of these therapies are a lack of specificity and drug resistance. As the majority of these redox-related mechanisms also play an important role in successful and coordinated cell functioning and reproduction, the regeneration process offers a unique parallel context for modern cancer research. This review focuses on the interconnections between regeneration and carcinogenesis and how an understanding of regenerative forces and redox-controlled mechanisms could contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets to block the growth and survival of cancer cells.",
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author = "An-Sofie Stevens and Nicky Pirotte and Annelies Wouters and {Van Roten}, Andromeda and {Van Belleghem}, Frank and Maxime Willems and Ann Cuypers and Tom Artois and Karen Smeets",
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Stevens, A-S, Pirotte, N, Wouters, A, Van Roten, A, Van Belleghem, F, Willems, M, Cuypers, A, Artois, T & Smeets, K 2016, 'Redox-Related Mechanisms to Rebalance Cancer-Deregulated Cell Growth', Current Drug Targets, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1414-1437. https://doi.org/10.2174/1389450116666150506112817

Redox-Related Mechanisms to Rebalance Cancer-Deregulated Cell Growth. / Stevens, An-Sofie; Pirotte, Nicky; Wouters, Annelies; Van Roten, Andromeda; Van Belleghem, Frank; Willems, Maxime; Cuypers, Ann; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen.

In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 17, No. 12, 2016, p. 1414-1437.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Stevens, An-Sofie

AU - Pirotte, Nicky

AU - Wouters, Annelies

AU - Van Roten, Andromeda

AU - Van Belleghem, Frank

AU - Willems, Maxime

AU - Cuypers, Ann

AU - Artois, Tom

AU - Smeets, Karen

PY - 2016

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AB - A delicate balance exists between the process of carcinogenesis and tissue regeneration. A number of malignant tumours are considered the outcome of an impaired or incomplete regeneration process, resulting in persistently dividing cells. Regeneration-competent tissues and animals are able to prevent and counteract growth abnormalities and seem to have a low vulnerability to chemical carcinogenesis. Cancer cell survival depends, among other things, on various redox-related mechanisms, which are targets of currently developed therapies. Disadvantages of these therapies are a lack of specificity and drug resistance. As the majority of these redox-related mechanisms also play an important role in successful and coordinated cell functioning and reproduction, the regeneration process offers a unique parallel context for modern cancer research. This review focuses on the interconnections between regeneration and carcinogenesis and how an understanding of regenerative forces and redox-controlled mechanisms could contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets to block the growth and survival of cancer cells.

KW - Anticarcinogenic therapies

KW - carcinogenesis

KW - redox-related mechanisms

KW - regeneration

KW - stem cells

KW - NF-KAPPA-B

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KW - OXYGEN SPECIES ACCUMULATION

KW - AXON REGENERATION REQUIRES

KW - INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1-ALPHA

KW - INHIBITS TUMOR-GROWTH

KW - OXIDATIVE STRESS

KW - BREAST-CANCER

KW - STEM-CELLS

KW - PLANARIAN REGENERATION

U2 - 10.2174/1389450116666150506112817

DO - 10.2174/1389450116666150506112817

M3 - Review article

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JO - Current Drug Targets

JF - Current Drug Targets

SN - 1389-4501

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ER -