Self-Efficacy in Eliciting Social Support and Burnout Among Secondary-School Teachers

A. Brouwers, W. Evers, W. Tomic

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    A nonrecursive model with relationships between perceived lack of social support, perceived self-efficacy in eliciting support at the workplace, and the three successive burnout dimensions –emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment– was tested in a sample of 277 secondary-school teachers in The Netherlands. Results showed that teachers' perceived lack of support from colleagues and principals had a significant effect on their self-efficacy beliefs in eliciting support from them, while these self-efficacy beliefs were shown to predict their level of burnout. The hypothesized feedback loop was also confirmed: Teachers' level of burnout predicted the extent to which they feel lack of support. An additional effect of the personal-accomplishment dimension of burnout on perceived self-efficacy was suggested. It was concluded that perceived self-efficacy in eliciting support at the workplace is a usable construct in the prediction of teacher burnout. Future directions in research are suggested.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1474-1491
    Number of pages18
    JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
    Volume31
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2001

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