Sex differences in emotional and behavioral responses to HIV plus individuals' expression of distress

Arjan E. R. Bos*, Anton J. M. Dijker, Willem Koomen

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference article in journalAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Two studies examined the influence of HIV+ individual's expression of distress on perceivers' emotional and behavioral reactions. In Study 1 ( N = 224), HIV+ individual's expression of distress was experimentally manipulated by means of vignettes. Men and women reacted differently when persons with HIV conveyed distress: women reported stronger feelings of pity, whereas men reported stronger feelings of anger. Study 2 ( N = 136) replicated this study in a realistic experimental setting with additional behavioral measures. Similarly, women reported stronger pro-social behavior than men when confronted with a person with HIV who conveyed distress. Results of the present study shed additional light to the self-presentational dilemma of ill persons. Conveying moderate levels of distress may evoke pro-social responses in women, but not in men.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)493-511
    Number of pages19
    JournalPsychology & Health
    Volume22
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2007
    Event17th Annual Conference of the European-Health-Psychology-Society - Kos, Greece
    Duration: 24 Sep 200327 Sep 2003

    Keywords

    • AIDS
    • HIV
    • emotion
    • stigma
    • distress
    • sex differences
    • AIDS-RELATED STIGMATIZATION
    • ILL PERSONS
    • STIGMA
    • PERSPECTIVE
    • EXPERIENCE
    • DISEASE
    • PEOPLE
    • GENDER
    • MODEL
    • FEAR

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