Social Network Analyses (SNA) as a method to study the structure of contacts within teams of a school for secondary education

Celeste Meijs, Maarten De Laat

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Article in proceedingAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper reports findings from a study using social network analysis techniques to understand social learning relationships within and between teacher teams in a large secondary school in the Netherlands (n=117 teachers). The findings suggest a relationship between the social structure of a team and their preferred way of learning and it highlights the impact certain functions or positions in a school can have on the ability to develop social relationships. Findings will be used to improve tools and instruments to detect, visualise and facilitate informal professional development networks in school organizations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Networked Learning 2012
    Subtitle of host publication2nd, 3rd, 4th April, 2012, Maastricht School of Management, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    EditorsVivien Hodgson, Chris Jones, Maarten de Laat, David McConnell, Thomas Ryberg, Peter Sloep
    PublisherLancaster University
    Pages194-202
    Number of pages9
    Edition1
    ISBN (Electronic)9781862202832
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Event8th International Conference on Networked Learning - Maastricht School of Management, Maastricht, Netherlands
    Duration: 2 Apr 20124 Apr 2012
    http://www.networkedlearningconference.org.uk/past/nlc2012/index.htm

    Conference

    Conference8th International Conference on Networked Learning
    Country/TerritoryNetherlands
    CityMaastricht
    Period2/04/124/04/12
    Internet address

    Keywords

    • social learning
    • Social network analyses

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