Teacher Burnout, Perceived Self-Efficacy in Classroom Management, and Student Disruptive Behaviour in Secondary Education

A. Brouwers, W. Tomic

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    The present study modelled relations between student disruptive behaviour, perceived self-efficacy in classroom management, and teacher burnout among 558 secondary school teachers. Perceived self-efficacy was assumed to mediate the effect of student disruptive behaviour on teacher burnout. Student disruptive behaviour and burnout were considered to feed on each other. Burnout was conceptualized as a two-dimensional construct, including emotional exhaustion and negative attitudes. Results concerning the measurement model suggested that depersonalization and emotional exhaustion must be loaded on one dimension of burnout, which was named the core of burnout. The other dimension is personal accomplishment. Results concerning the structural model showed that all the assumed effects were significant. A direct effect of personal accomplishment on perceived self- efficacy was suggested. It was concluded that perceived self-efficacy in classroom management is a usable construct in the explanation of teacher burnout. Future directions in research are suggested.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)7-26
    Number of pages20
    JournalCurriculum and Teaching
    Volume14
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1999

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