The Application of Grave Breaches at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Kristin Rosella, Göran Sluiter, Marc Tiernan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) is a hybrid court established to prosecute the senior leaders of the Democratic Kampuchea (DK) and those persons most responsible for the crimes committed between 17 April 1975 and 6 January 1979. Since its inception, the Court has tried five accused and convicted three accused, while three additional individuals have been investigated and charged with crimes but have not yet been tried. The subject-matter jurisdiction of the Court includes crimes against humanity (CAH), genocide, grave breaches of the four Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 (Geneva Conventions), and serious violations of the Cambodian Penal Code of 1956.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAsia-Pacific Perspectives on International Humanitarian Law
EditorsSuzannah Linton, Tim McCormack, Sandesh Sivakumaran
Place of PublicationCambridge
PublisherCambridge University Press
Chapter32
Pages564–585
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9781108667203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

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Rosella, K., Sluiter, G., & Tiernan, M. (2019). The Application of Grave Breaches at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. In S. Linton, T. McCormack, & S. Sivakumaran (Eds.), Asia-Pacific Perspectives on International Humanitarian Law (pp. 564–585). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108667203.032