The association between subjective job insecurity and job performance across different employment groups: Evidence from a representative sample from the Netherlands

Tinka van Vuuren*, Jeroen P. de Jong, Peter G.W. Smulders

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance, and to assess how this association is different across different employment groups.

Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a data set owned by TNO and Statistics Netherlands of more than 89,000 Dutch workers and self-employed that is a representative sample of the Dutch workforce. The authors included data from 2014 and 2016 assessing subjective job insecurity in terms of “a concern about the future of one’s job/business” and self-rated job performance.

Findings: The effect size of the association between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance is small. For temporary agency workers and on-call workers, the association between subjective job insecurity and job performance is weaker compared to permanent workers and fixed-term workers. However for self-employed workers with and without employees, however, the relation between subjective job insecurity and job performance is stronger compared to permanent workers.

Research limitations/implications: The biggest limitation is the cross-sectional design of the study, which limits conclusions about causality.

Practical implications: The finding that subjective job insecurity goes together with less work performance shows that job insecurity has no upside for the productivity of companies.

Originality/value: The study provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance on a national level.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages18
JournalCareer Development International
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Nov 2019

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job performance
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Job performance
Job insecurity
causality
Workers
productivity
statistics
employee
methodology

Cite this

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title = "The association between subjective job insecurity and job performance across different employment groups: Evidence from a representative sample from the Netherlands",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance, and to assess how this association is different across different employment groups.Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a data set owned by TNO and Statistics Netherlands of more than 89,000 Dutch workers and self-employed that is a representative sample of the Dutch workforce. The authors included data from 2014 and 2016 assessing subjective job insecurity in terms of “a concern about the future of one’s job/business” and self-rated job performance.Findings: The effect size of the association between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance is small. For temporary agency workers and on-call workers, the association between subjective job insecurity and job performance is weaker compared to permanent workers and fixed-term workers. However for self-employed workers with and without employees, however, the relation between subjective job insecurity and job performance is stronger compared to permanent workers.Research limitations/implications: The biggest limitation is the cross-sectional design of the study, which limits conclusions about causality.Practical implications: The finding that subjective job insecurity goes together with less work performance shows that job insecurity has no upside for the productivity of companies.Originality/value: The study provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance on a national level.",
author = "{van Vuuren}, Tinka and {de Jong}, {Jeroen P.} and Smulders, {Peter G.W.}",
year = "2019",
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journal = "Career Development International",
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The association between subjective job insecurity and job performance across different employment groups : Evidence from a representative sample from the Netherlands. / van Vuuren, Tinka; de Jong, Jeroen P.; Smulders, Peter G.W.

In: Career Development International, 26.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance, and to assess how this association is different across different employment groups.Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a data set owned by TNO and Statistics Netherlands of more than 89,000 Dutch workers and self-employed that is a representative sample of the Dutch workforce. The authors included data from 2014 and 2016 assessing subjective job insecurity in terms of “a concern about the future of one’s job/business” and self-rated job performance.Findings: The effect size of the association between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance is small. For temporary agency workers and on-call workers, the association between subjective job insecurity and job performance is weaker compared to permanent workers and fixed-term workers. However for self-employed workers with and without employees, however, the relation between subjective job insecurity and job performance is stronger compared to permanent workers.Research limitations/implications: The biggest limitation is the cross-sectional design of the study, which limits conclusions about causality.Practical implications: The finding that subjective job insecurity goes together with less work performance shows that job insecurity has no upside for the productivity of companies.Originality/value: The study provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance on a national level.

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