The UNGA Resolutions on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels, 2006–Post 2015

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

For almost a decade, the un General Assembly (unga) has adopted annual resolutions on ‘the rule of law at the national and international levels.’ Moreover, the unga has held a High-level Meeting in September 2012 where Heads of State and Government discussed the topic for the first time ever and issued a declaration. This paper assesses the results. Its core question is whether unga commitment to rule of law at the national level is merely a vague aspiration or whether it has concrete normative content. The main conclusions are that: (a) the 9 annual resolutions have so far articulated neither a clear concept of rule of law nor a set of requirements or a minimum standard which States should respect in their legal systems; (b) the 2012 High-level Declaration articulates a thin conception of rule of law, i.e., stresses formal legality; (c) that the Declaration largely confirms Aust and Nolte’s analysis of lex lata with respect to the rule of law at the national level, but that it also departs from it somewhat; (d) that the unga’s commitment to rule of law is compatible with different political systems and normative outlooks. In 2015, the unga will again discuss rule of law in the context of renewal of the Millennium Development Goals (mdgs), and it seems likely after the Secretary General’s Road to Dignity by 2030 that rule of law is an important aspect of the new Sustainable Development Goals (sdgs).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMax Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law
EditorsFrauke Lachenmann, Tilman J. Röder, Rüdiger Wolfrum
Place of PublicationLeiden/Boston
PublisherBrill Academic Publishers
Pages258-285
Number of pages27
Volume18
Edition1
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMax Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law
PublisherBrill
ISSN (Print)1389-4633

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constitutional state
commitment
head of state
legality
legal system
political system
respect
sustainable development

Cite this

Janse, R. (2014). The UNGA Resolutions on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels, 2006–Post 2015. In F. Lachenmann, T. J. Röder, & R. Wolfrum (Eds.), Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law (1 ed., Vol. 18, pp. 258-285). (Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law). Leiden/Boston: Brill Academic Publishers.
Janse, R. / The UNGA Resolutions on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels, 2006–Post 2015. Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law. editor / Frauke Lachenmann ; Tilman J. Röder ; Rüdiger Wolfrum. Vol. 18 1. ed. Leiden/Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. pp. 258-285 (Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law).
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Janse, R 2014, The UNGA Resolutions on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels, 2006–Post 2015. in F Lachenmann, TJ Röder & R Wolfrum (eds), Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law. 1 edn, vol. 18, Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law, Brill Academic Publishers, Leiden/Boston, pp. 258-285.

The UNGA Resolutions on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels, 2006–Post 2015. / Janse, R.

Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law. ed. / Frauke Lachenmann; Tilman J. Röder; Rüdiger Wolfrum. Vol. 18 1. ed. Leiden/Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. p. 258-285 (Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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Janse R. The UNGA Resolutions on the Rule of Law at the National and International Levels, 2006–Post 2015. In Lachenmann F, Röder TJ, Wolfrum R, editors, Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law. 1 ed. Vol. 18. Leiden/Boston: Brill Academic Publishers. 2014. p. 258-285. (Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law).