Uncovering the Problem-Solving Process: Cued Retrospective Reporting Versus Concurrent and Retrospective Reporting

Tamara Van Gog, G.W.C. Paas, J.J.G. van Merrienboer, P. Witte

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    Abstract

    This study investigated the amounts of problem-solving process information ("action," "why," "how," and "metacognitive") elicited by means of concurrent, retrospective, and cued retrospective reporting. In a within-participants design, 26 participants completed electrical circuit troubleshooting tasks under different reporting conditions. The method of cued retrospective reporting used the original computer-based task and a superimposed record of the participant's eye fixations and mouse-keyboard operations as a cue for retrospection. Cued retrospective reporting (with the exception of why information) and concurrent reporting (with the exception of metacognitive information) resulted in a higher number of codes on the different types of information than did retrospective reporting.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)237-244
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Applied
    Volume11
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

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