Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study

Elissa Klaassen, Sarah Plukaard, Elisabeth Evers, Renate De Groot, Walter Backes, Dick Veltman, Jelle Jolles, Joshua Oon Soo Goh (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding tasks and to a control condition. Results showed age-related brain activation differences underlying behavioral performance including: (1) greater activation in middle-aged vs. young teachers in bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas; and (2) differential fatigue effects in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) depending on age group. Middle-aged schoolteachers showed decreased ACC activation in the fatigue compared to the control condition, whereas no change in activation was found in young teachers. Findings demonstrate age effects in these middle-aged subjects that are typically found in older adults, specifically in PFC over-activation. Findings also indicate that already in middle age cognitive aging may be associated with greater resource depletion following sustained task performance. The findings underscore the notion that persons in a cognitively demanding profession can experience subtle age effects, which are evident on fMRI and which impact daily functioning. Possible practical implications for middle-aged schoolteachers are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Article number148
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume10
Issue number148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Gyrus Cinguli
Prefrontal Cortex
Task Performance and Analysis
Age Groups
Brain

Keywords

  • episodic memory
  • schoolteachers
  • aging
  • mental fatigue
  • fMRI
  • middle age

Cite this

Klaassen, Elissa ; Plukaard, Sarah ; Evers, Elisabeth ; De Groot, Renate ; Backes, Walter ; Veltman, Dick ; Jolles, Jelle ; Goh, Joshua Oon Soo (Editor). / Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study. In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 148.
@article{70439e0f80384b46a441362600ea9ad2,
title = "Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study",
abstract = "This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding tasks and to a control condition. Results showed age-related brain activation differences underlying behavioral performance including: (1) greater activation in middle-aged vs. young teachers in bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas; and (2) differential fatigue effects in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) depending on age group. Middle-aged schoolteachers showed decreased ACC activation in the fatigue compared to the control condition, whereas no change in activation was found in young teachers. Findings demonstrate age effects in these middle-aged subjects that are typically found in older adults, specifically in PFC over-activation. Findings also indicate that already in middle age cognitive aging may be associated with greater resource depletion following sustained task performance. The findings underscore the notion that persons in a cognitively demanding profession can experience subtle age effects, which are evident on fMRI and which impact daily functioning. Possible practical implications for middle-aged schoolteachers are discussed.",
keywords = "episodic memory, schoolteachers, aging, mental fatigue, fMRI, middle age",
author = "Elissa Klaassen and Sarah Plukaard and Elisabeth Evers and {De Groot}, Renate and Walter Backes and Dick Veltman and Jelle Jolles and Goh, {Joshua Oon Soo}",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "7",
doi = "10.3389/fnhum.2016.00148",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Frontiers in Human Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5161",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",
number = "148",

}

Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study. / Klaassen, Elissa; Plukaard, Sarah; Evers, Elisabeth; De Groot, Renate; Backes, Walter; Veltman, Dick; Jolles, Jelle; Goh, Joshua Oon Soo (Editor).

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 10, No. 148, 148, 07.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study

AU - Klaassen, Elissa

AU - Plukaard, Sarah

AU - Evers, Elisabeth

AU - De Groot, Renate

AU - Backes, Walter

AU - Veltman, Dick

AU - Jolles, Jelle

A2 - Goh, Joshua Oon Soo

PY - 2016/4/7

Y1 - 2016/4/7

N2 - This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding tasks and to a control condition. Results showed age-related brain activation differences underlying behavioral performance including: (1) greater activation in middle-aged vs. young teachers in bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas; and (2) differential fatigue effects in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) depending on age group. Middle-aged schoolteachers showed decreased ACC activation in the fatigue compared to the control condition, whereas no change in activation was found in young teachers. Findings demonstrate age effects in these middle-aged subjects that are typically found in older adults, specifically in PFC over-activation. Findings also indicate that already in middle age cognitive aging may be associated with greater resource depletion following sustained task performance. The findings underscore the notion that persons in a cognitively demanding profession can experience subtle age effects, which are evident on fMRI and which impact daily functioning. Possible practical implications for middle-aged schoolteachers are discussed.

AB - This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding tasks and to a control condition. Results showed age-related brain activation differences underlying behavioral performance including: (1) greater activation in middle-aged vs. young teachers in bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas; and (2) differential fatigue effects in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) depending on age group. Middle-aged schoolteachers showed decreased ACC activation in the fatigue compared to the control condition, whereas no change in activation was found in young teachers. Findings demonstrate age effects in these middle-aged subjects that are typically found in older adults, specifically in PFC over-activation. Findings also indicate that already in middle age cognitive aging may be associated with greater resource depletion following sustained task performance. The findings underscore the notion that persons in a cognitively demanding profession can experience subtle age effects, which are evident on fMRI and which impact daily functioning. Possible practical implications for middle-aged schoolteachers are discussed.

KW - episodic memory

KW - schoolteachers

KW - aging

KW - mental fatigue

KW - fMRI

KW - middle age

U2 - 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00148

DO - 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00148

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5161

IS - 148

M1 - 148

ER -