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IMTO, de Onderzoekscompetentie: historie, achtergronden en de perceptie van de student

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Bijker, M. M. (2011). IMTO, de Onderzoekscompetentie: historie, achtergronden en de perceptie van de student. In E. Bakker, W. Giesbertz, J. Von Grumbkow, & T. Houtmans (Red.), Ontwikkeling van de onderzoekscompetentie aan de Open Universiteit (pp. 81-108). Heerlen: Open Universiteit, Faculteit Psychologie.

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